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Innovation and Knowledge Sourcing in the Vienna ICT Manufacturing Sector

Listed author(s):
  • Lukas Lengauer

    ()

  • Eva Nussmüller

    ()

  • Michaela Trippl

    ()

  • Franz Tödtling

    ()

The aim of this paper is to investigate the nature and geography of innovation and knowledge sourcing activities in the ICT manufacturing sector in the region of Vienna. Vienna is often regarded as a prime example of a fragmented metropolitan regional innovation system. Fragmented regional innovation systems are characterised by a strong endowment with knowledge infrastructure elements and other innovation relevant institutions, but they suffer from a lack of local networking and knowledge circulation. In this paper we examine for Vienna whether this key deficiency of the regional innovation system, i.e. fragmentation, is also a crucial feature of knowledge based sectors such as the ICT manufacturing industry which exhibit an analytical knowledge base. Drawing on 18 face-to- face interviews with firms and an analysis of 207 knowledge links and 264 knowledge transfer channels we will show that local collective learning processes are vital for innovative companies in the Vienna ICT manufacturing sector, whilst at the same time they rely heavily on international knowledge sources. The significance of the local level as interaction space for knowledge exchange found in the ICT manufacturing sector indicates that at least for this knowledge based industry, Vienna's innovation system is of a less fragmented nature than previous studies have suggested. Knowledge based sectors are characterised by a high level of localised knowledge circulation which underpins radical innovation. (authors' abstract)

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File URL: http://www-sre.wu-wien.ac.at/sre-disc/sre-disc-2008_04.pdf
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Paper provided by Institute for Multilevel Governance and Development, Department of Socioeconomics, Vienna University of Economics and Business in its series SRE-Disc with number sre-disc-2008_04.

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Length: 26 pages
Date of creation: 2008
Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwsre:sre-disc-2008_04
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Web page: http://www.wu-wien.ac.at/mlgd/

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  1. Anders Malmberg & Peter Maskell, 2002. "The elusive concept of localization economies: towards a knowledge-based theory of spatial clustering," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 34(3), pages 429-449, March.
  2. Trippl, Michaela & Tödtling, Franz & Lengauer, Lukas, 2007. "The Vienna software cluster: local buzz without global pipelines?," SRE-Discussion Papers 550, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business.
  3. Pavitt, Keith, 1984. "Sectoral patterns of technical change: Towards a taxonomy and a theory," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 13(6), pages 343-373, December.
  4. Michaela Trippl & Lukas Lengauer & Franz Tödtling, 2007. "Innovation und Wissensnetze im Wiener Informations- und Kommunikationtechnologiecluster," SRE-Disc sre-disc-2007_02, Institute for Multilevel Governance and Development, Department of Socioeconomics, Vienna University of Economics and Business.
  5. Michaela Trippl & Franz Todtling, 2007. "Developing Biotechnology Clusters in Non-high Technology Regions—The Case of Austria," Industry and Innovation, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(1), pages 47-67.
  6. M. S. Gertler & Y. M. Levitte, 2005. "Local Nodes in Global Networks: The Geography of Knowledge Flows in Biotechnology Innovation," Industry and Innovation, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(4), pages 487-507.
  7. Michael Fritsch, 2004. "Cooperation and the efficiency of regional R&D activities," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 28(6), pages 829-846, November.
  8. Bjorn Johnson & Edward Lorenz & B.-A. Lundvall, 2002. "Why all this Fuss about Codified and Tacit Knowledge?," Post-Print halshs-00483646, HAL.
  9. Ron A. Boschma & Anne L.W. ter Wal, 2006. "Knowledge networks and innovative performance in an industrial district. The case of a footwear district in the South of Italy," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 0601, Utrecht University, Section of Economic Geography, revised Jan 2006.
  10. Todtling, Franz & Trippl, Michaela, 2005. "One size fits all?: Towards a differentiated regional innovation policy approach," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(8), pages 1203-1219, October.
  11. Harald Bathelt & Andersand Malmberg & Peter Maskell, 2002. "Clusters and Knowledge Local Buzz, Global Pipelines and the Process of Knowledge Creation," DRUID Working Papers 02-12, DRUID, Copenhagen Business School, Department of Industrial Economics and Strategy/Aalborg University, Department of Business Studies.
  12. Franz Tödtling & Patrick Lehner & Michaela Trippl, 2005. "Innovation in knowledge intensive industries: The nature and geography of knowledge links," European Planning Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(8), pages 1035-1058, September.
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