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The geography of creative industries in Europe: A comparison analysis in Italy, France, the United Kingdom, Spain and Portugal

  • Rafael Boix Domenech

    ()

  • Luciana Lazzeretti
  • Francesco Capone
  • Lisa De Propris

    ()

  • Daniel Sanchez

The creative economy is a holistic and multidisciplinary concept that deals with the interaction between economics, culture and technology, and centred on the production of creative contents in goods and services. One of the most relevant dimensions of creativity is the territorial one. Despite the emphasis put on the theoretical definition of creativity, the measurement of creative industries and the use of these concepts in macro units as well as in isolated case studies, it is necessary to strengthen comparative research for the identification and analysis of the kind of creativity embedded in the territory, its determinants and its patterns of concentration. This compared research relies on the measurement of the creative industries and the identification of their territorial patterns of distribution in the local production systems of five European countries: Italy, France, the United Kingdom, Spain and Portugal. Creative local production systems are identified in these countries departing from local labour markets as territorial units, firms and jobs in creative industries, and focusing on two different kinds of creative industries: traditional cultural industries and technology-related creative industries. The results show that creative industries are more important in some countries like Italy and the United Kingdom, and that their spatial patterns of distribution are significantly different across countries, where three basic models emerge: distributed, concentrated and polarized. The implications of these patterns on the analysis of creative industries as well as on the design and implementation of policies are discussed.

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File URL: http://www-sre.wu.ac.at/ersa/ersaconfs/ersa10/ERSA2010finalpaper1501.pdf
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Paper provided by European Regional Science Association in its series ERSA conference papers with number ersa10p1501.

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Date of creation: Sep 2011
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Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa10p1501
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  1. Allen J. Scott, 2000. "The Cultural Economy of Paris," International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 24(3), pages 554-566, 09.
  2. Harabi, Najib, 2009. "Creative Industries: Case Studies from Arab Countries," MPRA Paper 15628, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Claude LACOUR (GREThA) & Sylvette PUISSANT (GREThA), 2008. "Medium-Sized Cities and the Dynamics of Creative Services," Cahiers du GREThA 2008-08, Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée.
  4. Fabio Sforzi & Andrea Lasagni, 2008. "Le determinanti dello sviluppo locale di attività ICT in Italia," ECONOMIA E POLITICA INDUSTRIALE, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2008(1), pages 155-167.
  5. Francesco Capone, 2007. "Mapping and Analysing Creative Systems in Italy (1991–2001)," Chapters, in: Creative Cities, Cultural Clusters and Local Economic Development, chapter 14 Edward Elgar.
  6. Peter Sunley & Steven Pinch & Suzanne Reimer & James Macmillen, 2008. "Innovation in a creative production system: the case of design," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 8(5), pages 675-698, September.
  7. Luciana Lazzeretti & Rafael Boix & Francesco Capone, 2008. "Do Creative Industries Cluster? Mapping Creative Local Production Systems in Italy and Spain," Industry and Innovation, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(5), pages 549-567.
  8. Fabio Sforzi, 2009. "The Empirical Evidence of Industrial Districts in Italy," Chapters, in: A Handbook of Industrial Districts, chapter 25 Edward Elgar.
  9. Ann Markusen & Gregory H. Wassall & Douglas DeNatale & Randy Cohen, 2008. "Defining the Creative Economy: Industry and Occupational Approaches," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 22(1), pages 24-45, February.
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