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The Emergence Of A Knowledge Agglomeration: A Spatio-Temporal Analysis Of Intellectual Capital In Indiana


  • Brigitte Waldorf



U.S. States and communities increasingly compete for intellectual power so as to thrive toward an economically vibrant setting that spurs the entrepreneurial spirit and attracts businesses and industries from around the world. As a recent report by the U.S. census reveals, 17 U.S. States have gained such intellectual power through the net inmigration of young, single and college educated persons. The State of Indiana is among the remaining thirty-three States that have a negative net balance, even ranking among the bottom ten in their ability to attract this highly valued population segment. In fact, for every young, single, college educated inmigrant, Indiana loses nearly two to other states. However, an analysis at the state-level hides important small-scale variations. This paper therefore investigates the processes leading to changes in the spatial distribution of knowledge workers across Indiana counties, with emphases on in-situ change, retention, intra- and interstate migration. The analysis shows that these demographic changes at the county level in fact reveal a less bleak picture than the state-wide aggregate figures suggest, and uncover remarkable peaks in the landscape of intellectual capital that can serve as a catalyst for attracting intellectual capital from outside the State.

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  • Brigitte Waldorf, 2005. "The Emergence Of A Knowledge Agglomeration: A Spatio-Temporal Analysis Of Intellectual Capital In Indiana," ERSA conference papers ersa05p558, European Regional Science Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa05p558

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    1. Maria Abreu Henri L. F. de Groot & Raymond J. G. M. Florax, 2005. "A Meta-Analysis of β-Convergence: the Legendary 2%," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(3), pages 389-420, July.
    2. Jari RitsilAa & Mika Haapanen, 2003. "Where do the highly educated migrate? Micro-level evidence from finland," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(4), pages 437-448.
    3. Jason Henderson & Bridget Abraham, 2004. "Can rural America support a knowledge economy?," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Q III, pages 71-96.
    4. Lydia Greunz, 2004. "Interregional knowledge spillovers in Europe," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/9483, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
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