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Shopping online and/or in-store? A structural equation model of the relationships between e-shopping and in-store shopping

Listed author(s):
  • Sendy Farag

    ()

  • Tim Schwanen

    ()

  • Martin Dijst

    ()

Registered author(s):

    Searching product information or buying goods online is becoming increasingly popular and could affect shopping trips. However, the relationship between e-shopping and in-store shopping is currently unclear. The aim of this study is to investigate empirically how the frequencies of online searching, online buying, and non-daily shopping trips relate to each other, after controlling for sociodemographic, land use, behavioral, and attitudinal characteristics. Data were collected from 826 respondents residing in four municipalities (one urban, three suburban) in the center of the Netherlands, using a shopping survey. Structural Equation Modeling was used to give insight in the mutual dependencies of the endogenous variables, and in direct and indirect effects between variables. The findings suggest that complementarity or generation between e-shopping and in-store shopping seems to be more likely to occur than substitution. The more often people search online, the more shopping trips they tend to make. Frequent in-store shoppers also buy frequently online. Shop accessibility has a negative effect on the frequency of online searching; the more shops are nearby, the less often persons search online. However, shop accessibility influences the frequency of online buying positively; the more shops are nearby, the more often persons buy online. Urbanisation level affects e-shopping indirectly via Internet use: urban residents shop online more often than suburban residents do, because urban residents use the Internet more often.

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    File URL: http://www-sre.wu.ac.at/ersa/ersaconfs/ersa05/papers/283.pdf
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    Paper provided by European Regional Science Association in its series ERSA conference papers with number ersa05p283.

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    Date of creation: Aug 2005
    Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa05p283
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    1. Mokhtarian, Patricia L & Salomon, Ilan & S, Lothlorien, 2001. "Understanding the Demand for Travel: It's Not Purely 'Derived'," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt5bh2d8mh, University of California Transportation Center.
    2. Golob, Thomas F., 2003. "Structural equation modeling for travel behavior research," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 1-25, January.
    3. Yun, Dae-Sic & O'Kelly, M. E., 1997. "Modeling the day-of-the-week shopping activity and travel patterns," Socio-Economic Planning Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 31(4), pages 307-319, December.
    4. Sivaramakrishnan Srinivasan & Chandra Bhat, 2005. "Modeling household interactions in daily in-home and out-of-home maintenance activity participation," Transportation, Springer, vol. 32(5), pages 523-544, September.
    5. Helen Couclelis, 2004. "Pizza over the Internet: e-commerce, the fragmentation of activity and the tyranny of the region," Entrepreneurship & Regional Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(1), pages 41-54, January.
    6. Forsythe, Sandra M. & Shi, Bo, 2003. "Consumer patronage and risk perceptions in Internet shopping," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 56(11), pages 867-875, November.
    7. Sendy Farag & Jesse Weltevreden & Ton van Rietbergen & Martin Dijst & Frank van Oort, 2006. "E-shopping in the Netherlands: does geography matter?," Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 33(1), pages 59-74, January.
    8. Patricia Mokhtarian, 2004. "A conceptual analysis of the transportation impacts of B2C e-commerce," Transportation, Springer, vol. 31(3), pages 257-284, August.
    9. Golob, Thomas F., 2001. "Joint models of attitudes and behavior in evaluation of the San Diego I-15 congestion pricing project," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 35(6), pages 495-514, July.
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