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Regional Concentration of Highly Educated Couples

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  • Signe Jauhiainen

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Abstract

There is empirical evidence (see e.g. Costa & Kahn 2000) that the educational background of both spouses has an effect on regional concentration. Finnish people have been migrating to urban regions. Especially higher education graduates prefer to live in cities. Because of this process human capital is concentrated in urban regions. Regional concentration of human capital can also be looked from a family perspective. A higher education graduate often has a spouse who has also graduated from university. In this situation the family moves to a region where they can find satisfying jobs. This study examines the residential choice of couples in which both spouses have higher education degree. The aim of this study is to find out where these couples live. In addition, families with different educational backgrounds are compared. The comparison might tell about the reasons of a familyÂ’s residential choice. Micro level data is used in empirical analysis.

Suggested Citation

  • Signe Jauhiainen, 2005. "Regional Concentration of Highly Educated Couples," ERSA conference papers ersa05p122, European Regional Science Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa05p122
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    4. Borjas, George J. & Bronars, Stephen G. & Trejo, Stephen J., 1992. "Self-selection and internal migration in the United States," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 159-185, September.
    5. Janice Compton & Robert A. Pollak, 2007. "Why Are Power Couples Increasingly Concentrated in Large Metropolitan Areas?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 25, pages 475-512.
    6. Simon, Curtis J., 1998. "Human Capital and Metropolitan Employment Growth," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 223-243, March.
    7. Jari RitsilAa & Mika Haapanen, 2003. "Where do the highly educated migrate? Micro-level evidence from finland," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(4), pages 437-448.
    8. Järvinen, Taru, 2002. "Locational decisions of educated family members in Finland," ERSA conference papers ersa02p097, European Regional Science Association.
    9. Moretti, Enrico, 2004. "Human capital externalities in cities," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics,in: J. V. Henderson & J. F. Thisse (ed.), Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, edition 1, volume 4, chapter 51, pages 2243-2291 Elsevier.
    10. Pencavel, John, 1998. "Assortative Mating by Schooling and the Work Behavior of Wives and Husbands," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(2), pages 326-329, May.
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