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Economic Transition and Elections in Poland

Author

Listed:
  • John E. Jackson
  • Jacek Klich
  • Krystyna Poznanska

Abstract

Poland's economic and political transition, one of the most successful transitions, has depended very heavily on the job creation in new firms to replace the jobs lost in the formerly state-owned enterprises. This uses evidence from both survey and aggregate data to analyze four Polish elections during the transition. These analyses indicate that these de novo firms, the individuals they employ, and the residents in the local areas where they exist become an important constituency supporting pro-reform political parties and constraining the actions of parties less sympathetic to the reforms. The creation of this political constituency helps explain how countries can successfully pursue both economic and political reforms.

Suggested Citation

  • John E. Jackson & Jacek Klich & Krystyna Poznanska, 2001. "Economic Transition and Elections in Poland," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 391, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  • Handle: RePEc:wdi:papers:2001-391
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    File URL: http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/39775/3/wp391.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Powers, Denise V. & Cox, James H., 1997. "Echoes from the Past: The Relationship between Satisfaction with Economic Reforms and Voting Behavior in Poland," American Political Science Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 91(3), pages 617-633, September.
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    3. Jackson, John E. & Thomas, Ann R., 1995. "Bank structure and new business creation lessons from an earlier time," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 323-353, June.
    4. Ricardo J. Caballero & Mohamad L. Hammour, 2000. "Creative Destruction and Development: Institutions, Crises, and Restructuring," NBER Working Papers 7849, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Brian Arthur, W. & Ermoliev, Yu. M. & Kaniovski, Yu. M., 1987. "Path-dependent processes and the emergence of macro-structure," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 294-303, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kim, Byung-Yeon & Jukka Pirttila, 2003. "The Political Economy of Reforms: Empirical Evidence from Post-Communist Transition in the 1990s," Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2003 120, Royal Economic Society.
    2. Fidrmuc, Jan & Tichit, Ariane, 2013. "How I learned to stop worrying and love the crisis," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 542-554.
    3. Doyle, Orla & Fidrmuc, Jan, 2004. "Who is in favor of enlargement? Determinants of support for EU membership in the candidate countries' referenda," ZEI Working Papers B 04-2004, University of Bonn, ZEI - Center for European Integration Studies.
    4. Doyle, Orla & Fidrmuc, Jan, 2003. "Anatomy of Voting Behaviour and Attitudes During Post-Communist Transition Czech Republic 1990-98," CEPR Discussion Papers 3801, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

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