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Post-harvest loss in Sub-Saharan Africa -- what do farmers say ?

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  • Kaminski, Jonathan
  • Christiaensen, Luc

Abstract

The 2007-2008 global food crisis has renewed interest in post-harvest loss, but estimates remain scarce, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa. This paper uses self-reported measures from nationally representative household surveys in Malawi, Uganda, and Tanzania. Overall, on-farm post-harvest loss adds to 1.4-5.9 percent of the national maize harvest, substantially lower than the Food and Agriculture Organization's post-harvest handling and storage loss estimate for cereals, which is 8 percent. Post-harvest loss is concentrated among less than a fifth of households. It increases with humidity and temperature and declines with better market access, post-primary education, higher seasonal price differences, and possibly improved storage practices. Wider use of nationally representative surveys in studying post-harvest loss is called for.

Suggested Citation

  • Kaminski, Jonathan & Christiaensen, Luc, 2014. "Post-harvest loss in Sub-Saharan Africa -- what do farmers say ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6831, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:6831
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Albert Park, 2006. "Risk and Household Grain Management in Developing Countries," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 116(514), pages 1088-1115, October.
    2. David E. Sahn & David Stifel, 2003. "Exploring Alternative Measures of Welfare in the Absence of Expenditure Data," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 49(4), pages 463-489, December.
    3. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
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    Citations

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    1. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:3:p:661-:d:134140 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Delgado, Luciana & Schuster, Monica & Torero, Maximo, 2017. "Reality of Food Losses: A New Measurement Methodology," MPRA Paper 80378, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Omotilewa, Oluwatoba J. & Ricker-Gilbert, Jacob & Ainembabazi, Herbert & Shively, Gerald, 2016. "Impacts of Improved Storage Technology among Smallholder Farm Households in Uganda," 2016 AAAE Fifth International Conference, September 23-26, 2016, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia 246454, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
    4. Carletto, Calogero & Corral, Paul & Guelfi, Anita, 2017. "Agricultural commercialization and nutrition revisited: Empirical evidence from three African countries," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 106-118.
    5. Sheahan, Megan & Barrett, Christopher B., 2014. "Understanding the agricultural input landscape in Sub-Saharan Africa : recent plot, household, and community-level evidence," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7014, The World Bank.
    6. M. S. Sibomana & T. S. Workneh & K. Audain, 2016. "A review of postharvest handling and losses in the fresh tomato supply chain: a focus on Sub-Saharan Africa," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 8(2), pages 389-404, April.
    7. Minten, Bart & Engida, Ermias & Tamru, Seneshaw, 2016. "How big are post-harvest losses in Ethiopia? Evidence from teff," ESSP working papers 93, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    8. Sheahan, Megan & Barrett, Christopher B., 2017. "Ten striking facts about agricultural input use in Sub-Saharan Africa," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 12-25.
    9. repec:spr:ssefpa:v:9:y:2017:i:6:d:10.1007_s12571-017-0734-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. repec:bla:ajarec:v:62:y:2018:i:1:p:139-160 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Kate Ambler & Alan de Brauw & Susan Godlonton, 2018. "Measuring postharvest losses at the farm level in Malawi," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 62(1), pages 139-160, January.
    12. repec:spr:ssefpa:v:9:y:2017:i:5:d:10.1007_s12571-017-0714-y is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Marshall Burke & Lauren Falcao Bergquist & Edward Miguel, 2018. "Sell Low and Buy High: Arbitrage and Local Price Effects in Kenyan Markets," NBER Working Papers 24476, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Kukom Edoh Ognakossan & Hippolyte D. Affognon & Christopher M. Mutungi & Daniel N. Sila & Soul-Kifouly G. Midingoyi & Willis O. Owino, 2016. "On-farm maize storage systems and rodent postharvest losses in six maize growing agro-ecological zones of Kenya," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 8(6), pages 1169-1189, December.
    15. repec:eee:jfpoli:v:75:y:2018:i:c:p:52-67 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Markets and Market Access; Crops and Crop Management Systems; Food&Beverage Industry; Technology Industry; Environmental Economics&Policies;

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