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Does growth generate jobs in Eastern Europe and Central Asia ?

Author

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  • Richter, Kaspar
  • Witkowski, Bartosz

Abstract

In Eastern Europe and Central Asia, the link from growth to jobs was tenuous in the first decade of the transition, giving rise to the notion of jobless growth. Yet, European countries suffered large job losses during the recent recession, suggesting that jobs and growth are closely entwined. This study takes a new look at this issue. It provides a cross-country analysis of the employment intensity of growth over the last decade and a half in Eastern Europe and Central Asia, which includes the 11 Central and Eastern European countries that joined the EU since 2004, the countries of former Yugoslavia, the Countries of Independent States and Turkey. The authors compare these findings with other regions in the world. The paper shows that the responsiveness of employment to output increased in the second decade of the transition. It also finds that in some instances employment growth increases with reforms of labor and product markets, stronger macroeconomic policy frameworks, better governance, and more economic integration and diversification.

Suggested Citation

  • Richter, Kaspar & Witkowski, Bartosz, 2014. "Does growth generate jobs in Eastern Europe and Central Asia ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6759, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:6759
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Omar S. Arias & Carolina Sánchez-Páramo & María E. Dávalos & Indhira Santos & Erwin R. Tiongson & Carola Gruen & Natasha de Andrade Falcão & Gady Saiovici & Cesar A. Cancho, 2014. "Back to Work : Growing with Jobs in Europe and Central Asia," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 16570.
    2. Davide Furceri & Ernesto Crivelli & Joël Toujas-Bernate, 2012. "Can Policies Affect Employment Intensity of Growth? A Cross-Country Analysis," IMF Working Papers 12/218, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Arias-Vazquez, Francisco Javier & Lee, Jean Nahrae & Newhouse, David, 2012. "The Role of Sectoral Growth Patterns in Labor Market Development," IZA Discussion Papers 6926, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Lorenzo E Bernal-Verdugo & Davide Furceri & Dominique Guillaume, 2012. "Labor Market Flexibility and Unemployment: New Empirical Evidence of Static and Dynamic Effects," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 54(2), pages 251-273, June.
    5. Laurence Ball & Daniel Leigh & Prakash Loungani, 2017. "Okun's Law: Fit at 50?," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 49(7), pages 1413-1441, October.
    6. Gimpelson, Vladimir & Kapeliushnikov, Rostislav, 2011. "Labor Market Adjustment: Is Russia Different?," IZA Discussion Papers 5588, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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    Cited by:

    1. Victoria Strokova & Mohamed Ihsan Ajwad, 2017. "Tajikistan Jobs Diagnostic," World Bank Other Operational Studies 26029, The World Bank.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Labor Markets; Labor Policies; Banks&Banking Reform; Markets and Market Access; Achieving Shared Growth;

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