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In the search for the optimal path to establish a funded pension system

Author

Listed:
  • Marcin Bielecki

    (Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw)

  • Krzysztof Makarski

    (National Bank of Poland; Warsaw School of Economics)

  • Joanna Tyrowicz

    (Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw; National Bank of Poland)

  • Marcin Waniek

    (University of Warsaw)

Abstract

We propose a politically feasible instrument for a nearly optimal transition from a pay-as-you-go to a funded scheme in a defined contribution pension system. It consists of compensating the transition generations in the form of pension benefits indexation more generous than would have prevailed in a clean DC system. Thus, this instrument allows to smoothen the welfare costs of transition over future generations via some small implicit debt. Our instrument proves robust to a number of parametric and modeling choices.

Suggested Citation

  • Marcin Bielecki & Krzysztof Makarski & Joanna Tyrowicz & Marcin Waniek, 2015. "In the search for the optimal path to establish a funded pension system," Working Papers 2015-22, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw.
  • Handle: RePEc:war:wpaper:2015-22
    as

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    File URL: http://www.wne.uw.edu.pl/index.php/download_file/1818/
    File Function: First version, 2015
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Woodland, A., 2016. "Taxation, Pensions, and Demographic Change," Handbook of the Economics of Population Aging, in: Piggott, John & Woodland, Alan (ed.), Handbook of the Economics of Population Aging, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 0, pages 713-780, Elsevier.
    2. Wang, Hong & Koo, Bonsoo & O'Hare, Colin, 2016. "Retirement planning in the light of changing demographics," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 52(PB), pages 749-763.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    defined contribution; pay-as-you-go; pre-funded; pension system;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions
    • E17 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications
    • C60 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - General

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