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Money Holdings, Inflation, and Welfare in a Competitive Market

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Abstract

This paper examines an environment where money is essential and agents exchange in perfectly-competitive, Walrasian markets. Agents consume and produce a homogeneous good, but hold money to purchase consumption in the event of a relatively low productivity shock. A Walrasian market delivers a non-degenerate distribution of money holdings across agents and avoids some of the computational difficulties associated with the market and pricing assumptions of bilateral matching and bargaining common to search-theoretic environments. The model is calibrated to long-run US velocity, and the welfare costs of inflation are assessed for variable buyer-seller ratios and persistent states of buying and selling.

Suggested Citation

  • Scott J. Dressler, 2009. "Money Holdings, Inflation, and Welfare in a Competitive Market," Villanova School of Business Department of Economics and Statistics Working Paper Series 2, Villanova School of Business Department of Economics and Statistics.
  • Handle: RePEc:vil:papers:2
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Stephen D. Williamson & Randall Wright, 2010. "New monetarist economics: methods," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue May, pages 265-302.
    2. Dressler, Scott, 2016. "A long-run, short-run, and politico-economic analysis of the welfare costs of inflation," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 47(PB), pages 255-269.
    3. Williamson, Stephen & Wright, Randall, 2010. "New Monetarist Economics: Models," Handbook of Monetary Economics,in: Benjamin M. Friedman & Michael Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Monetary Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 2, pages 25-96 Elsevier.
    4. Scott J. Dressler, 2011. "A Long-Run, Short-Run and Politico-Economic Analysis of the Welfare Costs of Inflation," Villanova School of Business Department of Economics and Statistics Working Paper Series 16, Villanova School of Business Department of Economics and Statistics.
    5. Guillaume Rocheteau & Pierre-Olivier Weill & Tsz-Nga Wong, 2015. "A Tractable Model of Monetary Exchange with Ex-post Heterogeneity," NBER Working Papers 21179, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Gabriele Camera & Yili Chien, 2014. "Understanding the Distributional Impact of Long‐Run Inflation," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 46(6), pages 1137-1170, September.
    7. Boel, Paola, 2013. "The Redistributive Effects of Inflation: an International Perspective," Working Paper Series 274, Sveriges Riksbank (Central Bank of Sweden), revised 01 Feb 2017.
    8. Benjamín García, 2016. "Welfare Costs of Inflation and Imperfect Competition in a Monetary Search Model," Working Papers Central Bank of Chile 794, Central Bank of Chile.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Monetary Policy; Inflation; Welfare; Walrasian Markets;

    JEL classification:

    • E40 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - General
    • E50 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - General

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