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Unemployment and Spell Duration during the Great Recession in the EU

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  • Carlos Gradín
  • Olga Cantó
  • Coral del Río

Abstract

The current economic recession has had unequal consequences on employment depending on the country considered. It is generally accepted that the negative impact of unemployment on individual welfare can be very different depending on its duration. However, conventional statistics on unemployment do not adequately capture to what extent the recession is not only increasing the incidence of unemployment but also its severity in terms of duration in time of ongoing unemployment spells. In this paper, we follow Shorrocks’s (2009a,b) proposal of a duration-sensitive measure of unemployment in order to analyze the different dynamic characteristics of unemployment in a selected group of European Union countries during the current Great Recession. Our results add some evidence on the relevance of incorporating the duration dimension in measuring unemployment and provide a tool for dynamic analysis based on cross-sectional data.

Suggested Citation

  • Carlos Gradín & Olga Cantó & Coral del Río, 2012. "Unemployment and Spell Duration during the Great Recession in the EU," Working Papers 1205, Universidade de Vigo, Departamento de Economía Aplicada.
  • Handle: RePEc:vig:wpaper:1205
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Martin Riese & K. Brunner, 1998. "Measuring the severity of unemployment," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 67(2), pages 167-180, June.
    2. Guell, Maia & Hu, Luojia, 2006. "Estimating the probability of leaving unemployment using uncompleted spells from repeated cross-section data," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 133(1), pages 307-341, July.
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    6. Paul, Satya, 2001. "A Welfare Loss Measure of Unemployment with an Empirical Illustration," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 69(2), pages 148-163, March.
    7. Cahuc, Pierre & Carcillo, Stéphane, 2011. "Is Short-time Work a Good Method to Keep Unemployment Down?," CEPR Discussion Papers 8214, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. Vani K. Borooah, 2002. "A Duration‐sensitive Measure of the Unemployment Rate: Theory and Application," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 16(3), pages 453-468, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Camp, Kevin & Waldorf, Brigitte, 2014. "The impact of spatial flexibility on unemployment duration in young college-educated workers," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 170678, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    2. Olivier Goudet & Jean-Daniel Kant & Gérard Ballot, 2017. "WorkSim: A Calibrated Agent-Based Model of the Labor Market Accounting for Workers’ Stocks and Gross Flows," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 50(1), pages 21-68, June.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    measurement of unemployment; spell duration; European Union;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D30 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - General
    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

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