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Inequality, Unemployment and Contemporary Europe

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  • Amartya Sen

Abstract

Inequality of incomes can differ substantially from inequality in other 'spaces' such as well-being, freedom, health, longevity, and quality of life. Given the massive sclae of unemployment in contemporary European economies, concentrating only on income inequality can be particularly deceptive for studying economic inequality, since unemployment causes deprivation in many other ways as well. This paper examines the different ways in which unemployment creates deprivation (other than through low income), and what implications these issues have on the relative merits of American and European attitudes respectively to individual responsibility and social commitment.

Suggested Citation

  • Amartya Sen, 1997. "Inequality, Unemployment and Contemporary Europe," STICERD - Development Economics Papers - From 2008 this series has been superseded by Economic Organisation and Public Policy Discussion Papers 07, Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, LSE.
  • Handle: RePEc:cep:stidep:07
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Caliendo, Marco & Künn, Steffen, 2011. "Start-up subsidies for the unemployed: Long-term evidence and effect heterogeneity," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(3), pages 311-331.
    2. Giovanni Andrea Cornia, 2016. "The mortality crisis in transition economies," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 298-298, October.
    3. Predrag Bejakovic, 2004. "Poverty, inequality and social exclusion in the European Union and Croatia," Chapters in books,in: Katarina Ott (ed.), Croatian Accession to the European Union: Institutional Challenges, volume 2, chapter 4, pages 79-103 Institute of Public Finance.
    4. Tindara Addabbo & Rosa García-Fernández & Carmen Llorca-Rodríguez & Anna Maccagnan, 2011. "The impact of the crisis on unemployment and household income in Italy and Spain," Working Papers 235, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    5. Marco Grasso, 2002. "A Dynamic Operationalization of Sen’s Capability Approach," Working Papers 59, University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Economics, revised Nov 2002.
    6. Christian Arndt & Juergen Volkert, 2009. "Poverty and Wealth Reporting of the German Government: Approach, Lessons and Critique," IAW Discussion Papers 51, Institut für Angewandte Wirtschaftsforschung (IAW).
    7. Andrés Rodríguez-Pose & Vassilis Tselios, 2009. "Education And Income Inequality In The Regions Of The European Union," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(3), pages 411-437.
    8. Fotis Papadopoulos & Panos Tsakloglou, 2015. "Chronic material deprivation and long-term poverty in Europe in the pre-crisis period," ImPRovE Working Papers 15/16, Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp.
    9. Poppitz, Philipp, 2017. "Can subjective data improve inequality measurement? A multidimensional index of economic inequality," Annual Conference 2017 (Vienna): Alternative Structures for Money and Banking 168252, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    10. Cornia, Giovanni Andrea & Rosignoli, Stefano & Tiberti, Luca, 2007. "Globalisation and health: impact pathways and recent evidence," Center for Global, International and Regional Studies, Working Paper Series qt2358z815, Center for Global, International and Regional Studies, UC Santa Cruz.
    11. Marja Riihelä & Risto Sullström & Matti Tuomala, 2001. "What Lies Behind the Unprecedented Increase in Income Inequality in Finland During the 1990's," Working Papers 0102, University of Tampere, School of Management, Economics.
    12. Carlos Gradín & Olga Cantó & Coral Río, 2017. "Measuring employment deprivation in the EU using a household-level index," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 15(2), pages 639-667, June.
    13. Mulligan Roisin, 2013. "Universal Basic Income and Recognition Theory – A Tangible Step towards an Ideal," Basic Income Studies, De Gruyter, vol. 8(2), pages 1-20, December.
    14. Jon Wisman, 2013. "The Growth Trap, Ecological Devastation, and the Promise of Guaranteed Employment," Challenge, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 56(2), pages 53-78.
    15. Marco Grasso & Luciano Canova, 2008. "An Assessment of the Quality of Life in the European Union Based on the Social Indicators Approach," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 87(1), pages 1-25, May.
    16. Canova, Luciano & Grasso, Marco & Vaglio, Alessandro & Di Giulio, Enzo & Migliavacca, Stefania & Lelli, Sara & Pareglio, Stefano, 2005. "Operationalising Senian capability approach by modelling human development," MPRA Paper 251, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    17. -, 2014. "Estudio Económico de América Latina y el Caribe 2014: desafíos para la sostenibilidad del crecimiento en un nuevo contexto externo," Estudio Económico de América Latina y el Caribe, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), number 36970 edited by Cepal, OCTOBER.
    18. -, 2014. "Economic Survey of Latin America and the Caribbean 2014: Challenges to sustainable growth in a new external context," Estudio Económico de América Latina y el Caribe, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), number 37033 edited by Eclac, OCTOBER.
    19. Carlos Gradin & Olga Canto & Coral del Rio, 2012. "Measuring employment deprivation among households in the EU," Working Papers 247, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.

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