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Rental Housing and Crime: The Role of Property Ownership and Management

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Abstract

This paper examines how residential rental property ownership characteristics affect crime. It examines the incidence and frequency of disturbances, assaults, and drug possession and distribution using police incident report data for privately owned rental properties. Results show that a small percentage of rental properties generate incident reports. Count model regressions indicate that the distance that the owner resides from the rental property, size of rental property holdings, tenant Section 8 voucher use, and neighborhood owner-occupied housing rates are associated with reported violations. The paper concludes with recommendations about local government policies that could help to reduce crime in rental housing.

Suggested Citation

  • Terance J. Rephann, 2008. "Rental Housing and Crime: The Role of Property Ownership and Management," Working Papers 2008-01, Center for Economic and Policy Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:vac:wpaper:wp08-01
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    File URL: http://econ.ccps.virginia.edu/RePEc_docs/ceps_docs/crime_paper.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. DiPasquale, Denise & Glaeser, Edward L., 1999. "Incentives and Social Capital: Are Homeowners Better Citizens?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(2), pages 354-384, March.
    2. Edward L. Glaeser & Bruce Sacerdote, 1999. "Why Is There More Crime in Cities?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(S6), pages 225-258, December.
    3. J. Scott Long & Jeremy Freese, 2006. "Regression Models for Categorical Dependent Variables using Stata, 2nd Edition," Stata Press books, StataCorp LP, edition 2, number long2, November.
    4. Dietz, Robert D. & Haurin, Donald R., 2003. "The social and private micro-level consequences of homeownership," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(3), pages 401-450, November.
    5. Spelman, William, 1993. "Abandoned buildings: Magnets for crime?," Journal of Criminal Justice, Elsevier, vol. 21(5), pages 481-495.
    6. Simon Hakim & Arie Ovadia & Eli Sagi & J. Weinblatt, 1979. "Interjurisdictional Spillover of Crime and Police Expenditure," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 54(2), pages 200-212.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    crime; rental housing; management; count model;

    JEL classification:

    • R29 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Other
    • K42 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior - - - Illegal Behavior and the Enforcement of Law

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