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Financial development and investment dynamics in Mauritius: A trivariate granger-casuality analysis

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  • Muyambiri, Brian
  • Odhiambo, Nicholas Mbaya

Abstract

This paper examines the causal relationship between both bank-based and market-based financial development and investment in Mauritius for the period from 1976 to 2014. The study assumes that investment and financial development have an accelerator-enhancing relationship. To accommodate the accelerator-enhancing relationship, the indicators for bank-based and market-based financial development are multiplied by the per capita GDP. In addition, to avoid variable omission bias, savings are used as an intermittent variable, thereby creating a trivariate Granger-causality model. The study makes use of the autoregressive distributed lag bounds testing approach. For both models, results indicate that both bank-based and market-based financial development Granger-cause investment, both in the short run and in the long run. The study, therefore, recommends that policies in Mauritius should focus mainly on promoting and strengthening banking sector and stock market development in order to spur investment.

Suggested Citation

  • Muyambiri, Brian & Odhiambo, Nicholas Mbaya, 2016. "Financial development and investment dynamics in Mauritius: A trivariate granger-casuality analysis," Working Papers 21161, University of South Africa, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:uza:wpaper:21161
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    File URL: http://uir.unisa.ac.za/bitstream/handle/10500/21161/UNISA%20Working%20Paper%2015%20Mauritius%20Causality.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Brian Muyambiri & Nicholas Odhiambo, 2017. "Financial Development, Savings and Investment in South Africa: A Dynamic Causality Test," Global Economy Journal (GEJ), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 17(3), pages 1-10, August.
    2. Simplice A. Asongu, 2014. "Linkages between investment flows and financial development: Causality evidence from selected African countries," African Journal of Economic and Management Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 5(3), pages 269-299, August.
    3. Helmi Hamdi & Rashid Sbia & Hakimi Abdelaziz & Wafa Khlaifia hakimi, 2013. "Multivariate Granger causality between foreign direct investment and economic growth in Tunisia," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 33(2), pages 1193-1203.
    4. Rousseau, Peter L. & Vuthipadadorn, Dadanee, 2005. "Finance, investment, and growth: Time series evidence from 10 Asian economies," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 87-106, March.
    5. Umar Bida Ndako, 2017. "Financial Development, Investment and Economic Growth: Evidence from Nigeria," Journal of Reviews on Global Economics, Lifescience Global, vol. 6, pages 33-41.
    6. Rousseau, Peter L., 1999. "Finance, investment, and growth in Meiji-era Japan," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 11(2), pages 185-198, April.
    7. Shahbaz, Muhammad & Zeshan, Muhammad & Afza, Talat, 2012. "Is energy consumption effective to spur economic growth in Pakistan? New evidence from bounds test to level relationships and Granger causality tests," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 2310-2319.
    8. Xun Lu & Dietrich Fausten & Russell Smyth, 2007. "Financial Development, Capital Accumulation and Productivity Improvement: Evidence from China," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(3), pages 227-242.
    9. Yongfu Huang, 2011. "Private investment and financial development in a globalized world," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 41(1), pages 43-56, August.
    10. Nicholas Odhiambo, 2010. "Finance-investment-growth nexus in South Africa: an ARDL-bounds testing procedure," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 43(3), pages 205-219, August.
    11. Thorsten Beck & Asli Demirgüç-Kunt & Ross Levine, 2000. "A New Database on the Structure and Development of the Financial Sector," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 14(3), pages 597-605, September.
    12. Xu, Zhenhui, 2000. "Financial Development, Investment, and Economic Growth," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 38(2), pages 331-344, April.
    13. Thorsten Beck & Asli Demirgüç-Kunt & Ross Levine, 2010. "Financial Institutions and Markets across Countries and over Time: The Updated Financial Development and Structure Database," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 24(1), pages 77-92, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Saungweme, Talknice & Odhiambo, Nicholas M, 2019. "Relative impact of domestic and foreign public debt on economic growth in South Africa," Working Papers 25664, University of South Africa, Department of Economics.
    2. Saungweme, Talknice & Odhiambo, Nicholas M, 2019. "Causality between public debt, public debt service and economic growth: Evidence from South Africa," Working Papers 25745, University of South Africa, Department of Economics.
    3. Saungweme, Talknice & Odhiambo, Nicholas M, 2019. "Sovereign debt and economic growth in Zimbabwe: Amultivariate causal linkage," Working Papers 25680, University of South Africa, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Mauritius; Investment; Bank-based financial development; Market-based financial development;

    JEL classification:

    • G10 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • G20 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - General
    • E22 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Investment; Capital; Intangible Capital; Capacity

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