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Sub-national vulnerability measures:A spatial perspective

Author

Listed:
  • Don J. Webber

    () (Department of Business Economics, Auckland University of Technology and Department of Economics, UWE, Bristol)

  • Stephanié Rossouw

    (Department of Business Economics, Auckland University of Technology and Department of Economics)

Abstract

Most empirical investigations into economic vulnerability focus on the national level. Although some recent contributions investigate vulnerability from a sub-national perspective they contribute to the literature in an aspatial manner, as they do not explicitly account for the relative locations of areas and for the potential of spillovers between contiguous areas. This paper extends the current literature on a number of important fronts. First, we augment a principle components model to take explicit account of spatial autocorrelation and apply it to South African magisterial district level data. Second, by comparing spatial and aspatial models estimates, our empirical results illustrate the presence and importance of spatial spillovers in local vulnerability index estimates. Third, we augment the methodology on the vulnerability intervention index and present results which highlight areas that are performing better and worse than would be expected. After accounting for spatial spillovers, the results illustrate a clear urban-rural vulnerability divide.

Suggested Citation

  • Don J. Webber & Stephanié Rossouw, 2010. "Sub-national vulnerability measures:A spatial perspective," Working Papers 1004, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwe:wpaper:1004
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    File URL: http://carecon.org.uk/DPs/1004.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economic vulnerability; Environmental vulnerability; Governance vulnerability; Demographic vulnerability; Health vulnerability;

    JEL classification:

    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes
    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being

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