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Deep Impact: China and the World Economy

  • Peter E Robertson

    (UWA Business School, The University of Western Australia)

Much of the debate about the impact of China on the international political economy arises from the many dimensions of the potential impact and the lack of historical precedent for such a large change. This paper provides some context for thinking about these issues by contrasting China’s recent expansion with the USA at the end of the last great wave of globalization, and reviewing recent quantitative modelling of China’s growth on other countries. It argues that China’s growth is good for the world economy with significant terms-of-trade gains being experienced in its trading partners, reductions in poverty and increases in living standards. Nevertheless it also suggests we should be cautious in predicting China’s future role in the world economy. It still commands only a fraction of the spending power of the USA and further growth will require China to embrace good institutions and continue the move to a more market-based economy.

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File URL: http://www.business.uwa.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0005/1627106/11-01-Deep-Impact-China-and-the-World-Economy.pdf
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Paper provided by The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics in its series Economics Discussion / Working Papers with number 11-01.

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Length: 23 pages
Date of creation: 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:uwa:wpaper:11-01
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  1. Kevin H. O'Rourke, 2002. "Europe and the causes of globalization, 1790 to 2000," Trinity Economics Papers 20021, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
  2. Robert Koopman & Zhi Wang & Shang-Jin Wei, 2008. "How Much of Chinese Exports is Really Made In China? Assessing Domestic Value-Added When Processing Trade is Pervasive," NBER Working Papers 14109, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Barry Eichengreen & Yeongseop Rhee & Hui Tong, 2007. "China and the Exports of Other Asian Countries," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer, vol. 143(2), pages 201-226, July.
  4. Richard G. Harris & Peter E. Robertson & Jessica Y. Xu, 2010. "The International Effects of China's Growth, Trade and Ecucation Booms," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 10-04, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
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