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Welfare Effects of Protection and Economies of Scale - The Case of The Australian Automotive Industry

Author

Listed:
  • MoonJoong Tcha

    (Department of Economics, The University of Western Australia)

  • Takashi Kuriyama

Abstract

The existence of economies of scale requires different interpretations of the welfare effect of protection on the industry from conventional analyses. This paper finds that the Australian automotive industry has economies of scale, and carries out relevant welfare analysis of tariff. Using the fully modified Phillips-Hansen method, the paper estimates long-run elasticities and changes in consumer and producer surplus by tariffs. With the presence of economies of scale, it is reported that the net deadweight effect of tariffs is relatively small, while the redistribution effects of tariffs are substantial. Also, it is found that the argument that tariffs protect domestic employment is not plausible in the Australian automotive case, due to the existence of economies of scale.

Suggested Citation

  • MoonJoong Tcha & Takashi Kuriyama, 2002. "Welfare Effects of Protection and Economies of Scale - The Case of The Australian Automotive Industry," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 02-11, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwa:wpaper:02-11
    as

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    File URL: http://ecompapers.biz.uwa.edu.au/paper/PDF%20of%20Discussion%20Papers/2002/02-11.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Dickey, David A & Fuller, Wayne A, 1981. "Likelihood Ratio Statistics for Autoregressive Time Series with a Unit Root," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(4), pages 1057-1072, June.
    2. Peter. Stubbs, 1972. "The Australian Motor Industry A Study in Protection and Growth," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 5(2), pages 51-51.
    3. Dixon, Peter B, 1978. "Economies of Scale, Commodity Disaggregation and the Costs of Protection," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 17(30), pages 63-80, June.
    4. Peter Stubbs, 1972. "The Australian Motor Industry A Study in Protection and Growth," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 5(1), pages 46-46.
    5. Takacs, Wendy E, 1994. "Domestic Content and Compensatory Export Requirements: Protection of the Motor Vehicle Industry in the Philippines," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 8(1), pages 127-149, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Australian automobile industry; protection; economies of scale; welfare effects;

    JEL classification:

    • F12 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Models of Trade with Imperfect Competition and Scale Economies; Fragmentation
    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations
    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade

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