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Just Another Niche in the Wall? How Specialization Is Changing the Face of Mainstream Economics

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There is considerable discussion on so-called ‘mainstream pluralism’, that is, on the co-presence of a variety of research programmes in today’s mainstream economics that: 1. significantly deviate from the neoclassical core; 2. are pursued by different, often separate communities of researchers; 3. have their origins outside economics. The literature tends to regard mainstream pluralism as a transitory state towards a new, post-neoclassical, mainstream. This paper advances a new interpretation: it suggests that the changing and fragmented state of mainstream economics is likely to persist over time under the impact of specialization (as a self-reinforcing mechanism) and the creation of new specialties and approaches, also through collaboration with researchers from other disciplines.

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  • Cedrini, Mario & Magda, Fontana, 2017. "Just Another Niche in the Wall? How Specialization Is Changing the Face of Mainstream Economics," Department of Economics and Statistics Cognetti de Martiis. Working Papers 201706, University of Turin.
  • Handle: RePEc:uto:dipeco:201706
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    Cited by:

    1. Ian Coelho de Souza Almeida & Rafael Galvão de Almeida & Lucas Resende de Carvalho, 2017. "Academic rankings and pluralism : the case of Brazil and the new version of Qualis," Textos para Discussão Cedeplar-UFMG 569, Cedeplar, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais.
    2. repec:bus:jphile:v:11:y:2017:i:1:n:2 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Dieter Bögenhold, 2017. "Social-scienciation of Economics and its Consequences: On a Relative Convergence between Economics and Sociology," STOREPapers 3_2017, Associazione Italiana per la Storia dell'Economia Politica - StorEP.

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