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Homo Socialis: An Analytical Core for Sociological Theory

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  • Gintis, Herbert
  • Helbing, Dirk

Abstract

We develop an analytical core for sociology. We follow standard dynamical systems theory by first specifying the conditions for social equilibrium, and then studying the dynamical principles that govern disequilibrium behavior. Our general social equilibrium model is an expansion of the general equilibrium model of economic theory, and our dynamical principles treat the society as a complex adaptive system that can be studied using evolutionary game theory and agent-based Markov models based on variants of the replicator dynamic.

Suggested Citation

  • Gintis, Herbert & Helbing, Dirk, 2015. "Homo Socialis: An Analytical Core for Sociological Theory," Review of Behavioral Economics, now publishers, vol. 2(1-2), pages 1-59, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:now:jnlrbe:105.00000016
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/105.00000016
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    Cited by:

    1. Cedrini, Mario & Magda, Fontana, 2017. "Just Another Niche in the Wall? How Specialization Is Changing the Face of Mainstream Economics," Department of Economics and Statistics Cognetti de Martiis. Working Papers 201706, University of Turin.
    2. Amos Witztum, 2016. "Experimental Economics, Game Theory and Das Adam Smith Problem," Eastern Economic Journal, Palgrave Macmillan;Eastern Economic Association, vol. 42(4), pages 528-556, September.
    3. Stephen V. Burks & Daniele Nosenzo & Jon Anderson & Matthew Bombyk & Derek Ganzhorn & Lorenz Goette & Aldo Rustichini, 2015. "Lab Measures of Other-Regarding Preferences Can Predict Some Related on-the-Job Behavior: Evidence from a Large Scale Field Experiment," Discussion Papers 2015-21, The Centre for Decision Research and Experimental Economics, School of Economics, University of Nottingham.
    4. Claudius Graebner & Birte Strunk, 2019. "Pluralism in economics: its critiques and their lessons," ICAE Working Papers 82, Johannes Kepler University, Institute for Comprehensive Analysis of the Economy.

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    Keywords

    Social theory;

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