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Heterodox United vs. Mainstream City? Sketching a Framework for Interested Pluralism in Economics

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  • Leonhard Dobusch
  • Jakob Kapeller

Abstract

Pluralism is a key term in the current discourse in heterodox economics, emphasizing the need for greater theoretical integration and institutional cooperation of different economic traditions. However, both the nature of pluralism and the concrete role ascribed to pluralist thinking for the development of economics have been somewhat contested, pointing to a lack of (widely agreed) conceptual foundations. This paper addresses this conceptual gap by proposing a framework for interested pluralism as a guideline for organizing heterodox economic research, in particular, as well as economic debates, in general. In essence, interested pluralism suggests replacing the traditionally invoked demarcation criteria between different economic traditions by a set of rather ecumenical pluralist principles, whose concrete implications for economic research we discuss.

Suggested Citation

  • Leonhard Dobusch & Jakob Kapeller, 2012. "Heterodox United vs. Mainstream City? Sketching a Framework for Interested Pluralism in Economics," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(4), pages 1035-1058.
  • Handle: RePEc:mes:jeciss:v:46:y:2012:i:4:p:1035-1058
    DOI: 10.2753/JEI0021-3624460410
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Glötzl, Florentin & Aigner, Ernest, 2015. "Pluralism in the Market of Science? A citation network analysis of economic research at universities in Vienna," Ecological Economic Papers 5, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business.
    2. Jakob Kapeller & Bernhard Schütz, 2014. "Debt, boom, bust: a theory of Minsky-Veblen cycles," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(4), pages 781-814.
    3. Bernhard Schütz, 2018. "Employment and the minimum wage: A pluralist approach," Economics working papers 2018-07, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
    4. Lakshmi, Geeta, 2018. "Gekko and black swans: Finance theory in UK undergraduate curricula," CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES ON ACCOUNTING, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 35-47.
    5. Cedrini, Mario & Magda, Fontana, 2017. "Just Another Niche in the Wall? How Specialization Is Changing the Face of Mainstream Economics," Department of Economics and Statistics Cognetti de Martiis. Working Papers 201706, University of Turin.
    6. Jakob Kapeller & Matthias Aistleitner & Stefan Steinerberger, 2017. "Citation Patterns in Economics and Beyond: Assessing the Peculiarities of Economics from Two Scientometric Perspectives," ICAE Working Papers 60, Johannes Kepler University, Institute for Comprehensive Analysis of the Economy.
    7. Robert Lepenies, 2014. "Economists as political philosophers : a critique of normative trade theory," RSCAS Working Papers 2014/11, European University Institute.
    8. Ambrosino, Angela & Fontana, Magda & Gigante, Anna Azzurra, 2015. "Shifting Boundaries in Economics: the Institutional Cognitive Strand," Department of Economics and Statistics Cognetti de Martiis. Working Papers 201544, University of Turin.
    9. Christian Grimm & Jakob Kapeller & Stephan Puehringer, 2018. "Paradigms and Policies: The state of economics in the german-speaking countries," ICAE Working Papers 77, Johannes Kepler University, Institute for Comprehensive Analysis of the Economy.
    10. Florentin Gloetzl & Ernest Aigner, 2015. "Pluralism in the Market of Science? A citation network analysis of economic research at universities in Vienna," Ecological Economics Papers ieep5, Institute of Ecological Economics.
    11. Katarzyna Gruszka & Annika Scharbert & Michael Soder, 2016. "Changing the world one student at a time? Uncovering subjective understandings of economics instructors' roles," Ecological Economics Papers ieep7, Institute of Ecological Economics.
    12. Heise, Arne & Thieme, Sebastian, 2016. "The Short Rise and Long Fall of heterodox Economics in germany After the 1970s: Explorations in a Scientific Field of Power and Struggle," MPRA Paper 80022, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Jakob Kapeller & Bernhard Schütz, 2015. "Conspicuous Consumption, Inequality and Debt: The Nature of Consumption-driven Profit-led Regimes," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 66(1), pages 51-70, February.
    14. Jo, Tae-Hee, 2016. "The Social Provisioning Process and Heterodox Economics," MPRA Paper 72384, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Matthias Aistleitner & Jakob Kapeller & Stefan Steinerberger, 2018. "Citation Patterns in Economics and Beyond," Working Papers Series 85, Institute for New Economic Thinking.
    16. Claudius Gräbner & Wolfram Elsner & Alexander Lascaux, 2018. "To Trust or to Control: Informal Value Transfer Systems and Computational Analysis in Institutional Economics," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 52(2), pages 559-569, April.
    17. Claudius Gräbner & Philipp Heimberger & Jakob Kapeller & Bernhard Schütz, 2018. "Structual change in times of increasing openness," FMM Working Paper 39-2018, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.
    18. Heise, Arne, 2019. "Ideology and pluralism: A German view," Discussion Papers 75, University of Hamburg, Centre for Economic and Sociological Studies (CESS/ZÖSS).
    19. Gruszka, Katarzyna & Scharbert, Annika Regine & Soder, Michael, 2017. "Leaving the mainstream behind? Uncovering subjective understandings of economics instructors' roles," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 131(C), pages 485-498.
    20. Gräbner, Claudius, 2016. "From realism to instrumentalism - and back? Methodological implications of changes in the epistemology of economics," MPRA Paper 71933, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    21. Beckenbach, Frank, 2019. "Monism in modern science: The case of (micro-)economics," Working Paper Series Ök-49, Cusanus Hochschule für Gesellschaftsgestaltung, Institut für Ökonomie.
    22. Jakob Kapeller & Bernhard Schütz, 2013. "Exploring Pluralist Economics: The Case of the Minsky-Veblen Cycles," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(2), pages 515-524.
    23. Angela Ambrosino & Magda Fontana & Anna Azzurra Gigante, 2018. "Shifting Boundaries In Economics: The Institutional Cognitive Strand And The Future Of Institutional Economics," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 32(3), pages 767-791, July.
    24. Claudius Graebner & Birte Strunk, 2019. "Pluralism in economics: its critiques and their lessons," ICAE Working Papers 82, Johannes Kepler University, Institute for Comprehensive Analysis of the Economy.

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