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A Tale of Two Monetary Reforms: Argentinean Convertibility in Historical Perspective

  • Esteban Pérez-Caldentey
  • Matías Vernengo
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    Argentina adopted currency type board arrangements to put an end to monetary instability in the nineteenth and the twentieth centuries under very different historical circumstances and contexts with very different results. The first currency board functioned within an international system that functioned in manner similar to a closed economy. The second currency board experiment the historical conditions. The poor export performance, and the unsustainable trade and current account deficits, resulting from the process of external liberalization, and the process of international financial liberalization eventually led to the collapse of the Convertibility experiment. The role of economic ideas – in particular, the incorrect lessons taken from the first globalization period – in furthering the economic imbalances were central to the failure of the 1991 Convertibility experiment.

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    Paper provided by University of Utah, Department of Economics in its series Working Paper Series, Department of Economics, University of Utah with number 2007_01.

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    Length: 45 pages
    Date of creation: 2007
    Date of revision:
    Publication status: Published in Studi e Note di Economia, XII.2: 139-70.
    Handle: RePEc:uta:papers:2007_01
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    2. Paolera, Gerardo della & Taylor, Alan M., 2001. "Straining at the Anchor," National Bureau of Economic Research Books, University of Chicago Press, edition 1, number 9780226645568.
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    7. Alcino F. Câmara Neto & Matias Vernengo, 2004. "Fiscal Policy and the Washington Consensus: A Post Keynesian Perspective," Working Paper Series, Department of Economics, University of Utah 2004_09, University of Utah, Department of Economics.
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    11. Frederic S. Mishkin, 1999. "Global Financial Instability: Framework, Events, Issues," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 13(4), pages 3-20, Fall.
    12. Thomas J. Sargent, 1982. "The Ends of Four Big Inflations," NBER Chapters, in: Inflation: Causes and Effects, pages 41-98 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Matias Vernengo, 2005. "Money and Inflation: A Taxonomy," Working Paper Series, Department of Economics, University of Utah 2005_14, University of Utah, Department of Economics.
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    15. Reinhart, Carmen, 2004. "Straining at the Anchor: The Argentine Currency Board and the Search for Macroeconomic Stability, 1880-1935: A Review," MPRA Paper 13201, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. Werner Baer & Pedro Elosegui & Andres Gallo, 2002. "The Achievements and Failures of Argentina's Neo-liberal Economic Policies," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(1), pages 63-85.
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