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The Importance of Interest Rate Volatility in Empirical Tests of Uncovered Interest Parity

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  • M. Hadzi-Vaskov
  • C.J.M. Kool

Abstract

Uncovered interest rate parity provides a crucial theoretical underpinning for many modelsin international finance and international monetary economics. Though theoretically sound,this concept has not been supported by the empirical evidence. Typically, econometrictests not only reject the null hypothesis, but also find significant slope coefficients with thewrong sign. Following the approach employed in Kool and Thornton (2004), we show thatthe empirical procedure conventionally used to test for UIP may produce biased slopecoefficients if the true data-generating process slightly differs from the theoreticallyexpected one. Using monthly data for ten industrial countries during the period W75-2004,we estimate the UIP relation for all possible bilateral country pairs for each of the six fiveyearsub-periods. The evidence supports the biasedness hypothesis: when the interest ratevolatility of the anchor country is very high (very low), this estimation procedure reportssignificantly higher (lower) slope coefficients.

Suggested Citation

  • M. Hadzi-Vaskov & C.J.M. Kool, 2006. "The Importance of Interest Rate Volatility in Empirical Tests of Uncovered Interest Parity," Working Papers 06-16, Utrecht School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:use:tkiwps:0616
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    5. Baillie, Richard T. & Bollerslev, Tim, 2000. "The forward premium anomaly is not as bad as you think," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 471-488, August.
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    7. Chaboud, Alain P. & Wright, Jonathan H., 2005. "Uncovered interest parity: it works, but not for long," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(2), pages 349-362, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Erdemlioglu, Deniz M, 2007. "A new Test of Uncovered Interest Rate Parity: Evidence from Turkey," MPRA Paper 10787, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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    Keywords

    International financial markets; estimation bias; Exchange Rate Volatility; Ordered by external client;

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