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Patterns and trends in horizontal inequality in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

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  • Isaac Kalonda Kanyama

Abstract

We analyse horizontal inequality in wealth and in years of education in the Democratic Republic of the Congo over the period 2001-13. We find that the trend in horizontal inequality is similar to the trend in vertical inequality over the period of analysis. In addition, horizontal inequality in years of formal education is higher among geographical, gender and linguistic groups, and lower among religious and ethnic groups.

Suggested Citation

  • Isaac Kalonda Kanyama, 2017. "Patterns and trends in horizontal inequality in the Democratic Republic of the Congo," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2017-151, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  • Handle: RePEc:unu:wpaper:wp-2017-151
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    References listed on IDEAS

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