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To return permanently or to return temporarily?: Explaining migrants' intentions

Author

Listed:
  • Bilgili, Ö.

    (UNU-MERIT)

  • Siegel, M.

    (UNU-MERIT)

Abstract

This paper studies migrants intentions to return to their origin country by making the distinction between permanent return, temporary return and participation in temporary return programmes. Using survey data from first generation migrants in the Netherlands, we explore how migrants experiences regarding both the origin and destination countries are linked to their return intentions. We show that there are significantly more people interested in temporary return than permanent return. Moreover, we demonstrate that while economic integration has no clear link with return intentions, individuals with a lower socio-cultural integration are more likely to intend to return permanently. We also find that social homeland engagement predicts intentions for all types of return. Considering the potential positive impact of temporary return on development through the transfer of skills, financial resources and experiences, this research provides insight into the profile of migrants who could be the target of programmes and policies on return for development.

Suggested Citation

  • Bilgili, Ö. & Siegel, M., 2014. "To return permanently or to return temporarily?: Explaining migrants' intentions," MERIT Working Papers 2014-041, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
  • Handle: RePEc:unm:unumer:2014041
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    File URL: https://www.merit.unu.edu/publications/wppdf/2014/wp2014-041.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. McCormick, Barry & Wahba, Jackline, 2001. "Overseas Work Experience, Savings and Entrepreneurship amongst Return Migrants to LDCs," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 48(2), pages 164-178, May.
    2. Dustmann, Christian, 1997. "Return migration, uncertainty and precautionary savings," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(2), pages 295-316, April.
    3. Hein de Haas & Tineke Fokkema, 2011. "The effects of integration and transnational ties on international return migration intentions," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 25(24), pages 755-782.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ngoc Thi Minh Tran & Michael P. Cameron & Jacques Poot, 2018. "What are Migrants Willing to Pay for Better Home Country Institutions?: The Case of Viet Nam," Working Papers in Economics 18/10, University of Waikato.
    2. Ngoc Thi Minh Tran & Michael P. Cameron & Jacques Poot, 2021. "Perception of Institutional Quality Difference and Return Migration Intention: The Case of the Vietnamese Diaspora," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 2114, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    3. Ngoc Thi Minh Tran & Michael P. Cameron & Jacques Poot, 2018. "Return or Not Return? The Role of Home-Country Institutional Quality in Vietnamese Migrants’ Return Intentions," Working Papers in Economics 18/04, University of Waikato.
    4. Ngoc Thi Minh Tran & Michael P. Cameron & Jacques Poot, 2019. "What are migrants willing to pay for better home country institutions?," Letters in Spatial and Resource Sciences, Springer, vol. 12(3), pages 257-268, December.
    5. Dekker, Bram & Siegel, Melissa, 2013. "Transnationalism and integration: Complements or Substitutes?," MERIT Working Papers 2013-071, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Migration; Reimmigration; Economic Development; Human Development;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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