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Social Sorting

Author

Listed:
  • Cowan, Robin
  • Jonard, Nicolas

    (MERIT)

Abstract

This paper is about the behaviour of a society in which learning individuals play a Prisoner’s Dilemma that guides social promotion and demotion. The direct effect of the payoff-based socialization that is implemented here is segregation. However, segregation permits the survival of cooperation as it (unintendedly) preserves cooperators from detrimental interactions with defectors. Very large amounts of cooperation can be observed in the long run.

Suggested Citation

  • Cowan, Robin & Jonard, Nicolas, 2003. "Social Sorting," Research Memorandum 035, Maastricht University, Maastricht Economic Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
  • Handle: RePEc:unm:umamer:2003035
    as

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    File URL: https://www.merit.unu.edu/publications/rmpdf/2003/rm2003-035.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Anderlini, Luca & Ianni, Antonella, 1996. "Path Dependence and Learning from Neighbors," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, pages 141-177.
    2. Ellison, Glenn, 1993. "Learning, Local Interaction, and Coordination," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 61(5), pages 1047-1071, September.
    3. Eaton, Curtis & Eswaran, Mukesh, 1998. "Endogenous Cartel Formation," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 37(1), pages 1-13, March.
    4. Robson, Arthur J. & Vega-Redondo, Fernando, 1996. "Efficient Equilibrium Selection in Evolutionary Games with Random Matching," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 70(1), pages 65-92, July.
    5. Steven N. Durlauf, 1993. "Nonergodic Economic Growth," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 60(2), pages 349-366.
    6. Vega-Redondo, Fernando, 2000. "Unfolding Social Hierarchies," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 90(2), pages 177-203, February.
    7. Kandori, Michihiro & Mailath, George J & Rob, Rafael, 1993. "Learning, Mutation, and Long Run Equilibria in Games," Econometrica, Econometric Society, pages 29-56.
    8. Blume Lawrence E., 1993. "The Statistical Mechanics of Strategic Interaction," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 5(3), pages 387-424, July.
    9. Berninghaus, Siegfried K. & Schwalbe, Ulrich, 1996. "Evolution, interaction, and Nash equilibria," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 57-85, January.
    10. Harrington, Joseph E, Jr, 1998. "The Social Selection of Flexible and Rigid Agents," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 63-82.
    11. Eshel, Ilan & Samuelson, Larry & Shaked, Avner, 1998. "Altruists, Egoists, and Hooligans in a Local Interaction Model," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 157-179.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. Wagner, Caroline S. & Leydesdorff, Loet, 2005. "Network structure, self-organization, and the growth of international collaboration in science," Research Policy, Elsevier, pages 1608-1618.

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    Keywords

    microeconomics ;

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