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Statistical inference for measures of predictive success

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  • Demuynck, T.

    (Microeconomics & Public Economics)

Abstract

We provide statistical inference for measures of predictive success. These measures are frequently used to evaluate and compare the performance of different models of individual and group decision making in experimental and revealed preference studies. We provide a brief illustration of our findings by comparing the predictive success of different revealed preference tests for models of intertemporal decision making.

Suggested Citation

  • Demuynck, T., 2014. "Statistical inference for measures of predictive success," Research Memorandum 009, Maastricht University, Graduate School of Business and Economics (GSBE).
  • Handle: RePEc:unm:umagsb:2014009
    DOI: 10.26481/umagsb.2014009
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    File URL: https://cris.maastrichtuniversity.nl/ws/files/656999/guid-4f3e38f5-09b8-48db-b907-b39e5244fffd-ASSET1.0.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Laurens Cherchye & Thomas Demuynck & Bram De Rock & Khushboo Surana, 2020. "Revealed Preference Analysis with Normal Goods: Application to Cost-of-Living Indices," American Economic Journal: Microeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 12(3), pages 165-188, August.
    2. Victor H. Aguiar & Roberto Serrano, 2018. "Cardinal Revealed Preference, Price-Dependent Utility, and Consistent Binary Choice," Working Papers 2018-3, Brown University, Department of Economics.
    3. Thomas Demuynck & Christian Seel, 2018. "Revealed Preference with Limited Consideration," American Economic Journal: Microeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 10(1), pages 102-131, February.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C10 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - General
    • C90 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - General
    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis

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