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Novelty Effects of New Facilities on Attendance at Professional Sporting Events

  • Dennis Coates

    ()

    (UMBC)

  • Brad R. Humphreys

    ()

    (UMBC)

We investigate the possibility that new facilities affect attendance - the "novelty effect" - in professional baseball, basketball, and football from 1969-2001 by estimating the parameters of a reduced form attendance model. Our results indicate a strong, persistent novelty effect in baseball and basketball and little or no novelty effect in football. Our estimates of size and duration of the novelty effect imply that, in a new facility, at a minimum, a baseball team would sell an additional 2,561,702 tickets over the first eight seasons, a basketball team 446,936 over the first nine seasons, and a football team 163,436 over the first five seasons. This increase in attendance also suggests a corresponding increase in revenues that could be tapped to help defray the large public subsidies that state and local governments frequently provide to new stadium and arena construction projects.

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File URL: http://www.umbc.edu/economics/wpapers/wp_03_101.pdf
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Paper provided by UMBC Department of Economics in its series UMBC Economics Department Working Papers with number 03-101.

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Length: 19 pages
Date of creation: Aug 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:umb:econwp:03101
Contact details of provider: Postal: UMBC Department of Economics 1000 Hilltop Circle Baltimore MD 21250, USA
Phone: 410-455-2160
Fax: 410-455-1054
Web page: http://www.umbc.edu/economics

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  1. Jaume Garcia & Placido Rodriguez, 2002. "The Determinants of Football Match Attendance Revisited: Empirical Evidence from the Spanish Football League," Journal of Sports Economics, , vol. 3(1), pages 18-38, February.
  2. Dennis Coates & Thane Harrison, 2004. "Baseball Strikes and the Demand for Attendance," UMBC Economics Department Working Papers 04-101, UMBC Department of Economics.
  3. Leo Kahane & Stephen Shmanske, 1997. "Team roster turnover and attendance in major league baseball," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(4), pages 425-431.
  4. Eckard, E Woodrow, 2001. "Free Agency, Competitive Balance, and Diminishing Returns to Pennant Contention," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 39(3), pages 430-43, July.
  5. Dennis Coates & Brad R. Humphreys, 1999. "The growth effects of sport franchises, stadia, and arenas," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(4), pages 601-624.
  6. Dennis Coates & Brad R. Humphreys, 2001. "The Economic Consequences of Professional Sports Strikes and Lockouts," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 67(3), pages 737-747, January.
  7. Brad R. Humphreys, 2002. "Alternative Measures of Competitive Balance in Sports Leagues," Journal of Sports Economics, , vol. 3(2), pages 133-148, May.
  8. Coates, Dennis & Humphreys, Brad R., 2003. "The effect of professional sports on earnings and employment in the services and retail sectors in US cities," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 175-198, March.
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