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The Impact of Fantasy Football Participation on NFL Attendance


  • Todd Nesbit


  • Kerry King



The fantasy sports industry, primarily led by fantasy football, has reportedly grown to 18 million unique players generating over $2 billion dollars annually according to the Fantasy Sports Trade Association. Anecdotal evidence suggests that this impressive growth is also generating increased interest for the sports on which the games are based. We use survey data from the ESPN Sports Poll to determine whether fantasy football participation increases NFL game attendance. The results suggest that fantasy football participants are not only more likely to attend at least one game per year, but also that they attend between 0.22 and 0.57 more games per season. Copyright International Atlantic Economic Society 2010

Suggested Citation

  • Todd Nesbit & Kerry King, 2010. "The Impact of Fantasy Football Participation on NFL Attendance," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 38(1), pages 95-108, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:atlecj:v:38:y:2010:i:1:p:95-108
    DOI: 10.1007/s11293-009-9202-x

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Dennis Coates & Thane Harrison, 2004. "Baseball Strikes and the Demand for Attendance," UMBC Economics Department Working Papers 04-101, UMBC Department of Economics.
    2. Craig A. Depken, II, 2001. "Fan Loyalty in Professional Sports: An Extension to the National Football League," Journal of Sports Economics, , vol. 2(3), pages 275-284, August.
    3. Craig A. Depken II, 2000. "Fan Loyalty and Stadium Funding in Professional Baseball," Journal of Sports Economics, , vol. 1(2), pages 124-138, May.
    4. Leo Kahane & Stephen Shmanske, 1997. "Team roster turnover and attendance in major league baseball," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(4), pages 425-431.
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    Cited by:

    1. Karg, Adam J. & McDonald, Heath, 2011. "Fantasy sport participation as a complement to traditional sport consumption," Sport Management Review, Elsevier, vol. 14(4), pages 327-346.

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    Attendance; Fantasy sports; NFL;


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