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Air Pollution and Per Capita Income: A Disaggregation of the Effects of Scale, Sectoral Composition, and Technological Change

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  • Rachel A. Bouvier

Abstract

During the last decade, researchers have investigated the relationship between per capita income and environmental quality. This paper disaggregates the relationship between per capita income and emissions of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and volatile organic compounds into scale, composition and technology effects, using data from European and North American countries from the period 1980-1986. Results indicate that the scale effect outweighs the composition and technology effects in the cases of carbon dioxide and volatile organic compounds, while the opposite is true in the cases of carbon monoxide and sulfur dioxide. The results also suggest that greater democracy is associated with lower emissions of all four pollutants.

Suggested Citation

  • Rachel A. Bouvier, 2004. "Air Pollution and Per Capita Income: A Disaggregation of the Effects of Scale, Sectoral Composition, and Technological Change," Working Papers wp84, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
  • Handle: RePEc:uma:periwp:wp84
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    File URL: https://www.peri.umass.edu/fileadmin/pdf/working_papers/working_papers_51-100/WP84.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jayadevappa, Ravishankar & Chhatre, Sumedha, 2000. "International trade and environmental quality: a survey," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 175-194, February.
    2. Selden Thomas M. & Song Daqing, 1994. "Environmental Quality and Development: Is There a Kuznets Curve for Air Pollution Emissions?," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 147-162, September.
    3. Scruggs, Lyle A., 1998. "Political and economic inequality and the environment," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 259-275, September.
    4. Stern, David I., 2002. "Explaining changes in global sulfur emissions: an econometric decomposition approach," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(1-2), pages 201-220, August.
    5. Matthew Kahn, 1995. "Micro Evidence on the Environmental Kuznets Curve," Public Economics 9507001, EconWPA.
    6. Torras, Mariano & Boyce, James K., 1998. "Income, inequality, and pollution: a reassessment of the environmental Kuznets Curve," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 147-160, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Maryia Hnatyshyn, 2016. "Decomposition of carbon dioxide and sulphur oxides emissions intensity change in the European Union," Ekonomia journal, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw, vol. 44.
    2. Kaika, Dimitra & Zervas, Efthimios, 2013. "The Environmental Kuznets Curve (EKC) theory—Part A: Concept, causes and the CO2 emissions case," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 1392-1402.
    3. Auci, Sabrina & Trovato, Giovanni, 2011. "The environmental Kuznets curve within European countries and sectors: greenhouse emission, production function and technology," MPRA Paper 53442, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Environmental Kuznets curve; emissions; carbon monoxide; carbon dioxide; sulfur dioxide; volatile organic compounds;

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