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Did Immigrants in the U.S. Labor Market Make Conditions Worse for Native Workers During the Great Recession?

Author

Listed:
  • Robert Pollin
  • Jeannette Wicks-Lim

Abstract

Did the presence of immigrant workers in the United States labor market—including both documented and undocumented workers—significantly affect conditions for low-wage native workers during the Great Recession of 2008-09? Building from the methodology developed by Card (2005), our basic finding is straightforward: the presence of immigrants in the U.S. labor market did not contribute in any significant way to the severe labor market problems faced by native workers during the recession. We do emphasize that our conclusion remains provisional until a broader set of data are brought to bear in investigating the question.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert Pollin & Jeannette Wicks-Lim, 2011. "Did Immigrants in the U.S. Labor Market Make Conditions Worse for Native Workers During the Great Recession?," Working Papers wp246, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
  • Handle: RePEc:uma:periwp:wp246
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    File URL: https://www.peri.umass.edu/fileadmin/pdf/working_papers/working_papers_201-250/WP246.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. David Card, 2005. "Is the New Immigration Really so Bad?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 115(507), pages 300-323, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Zhu, Pengyu & Liu, Cathy Yang & Painter, Gary, 2014. "Does residence in an ethnic community help immigrants in a recession?," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 112-127.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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