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Modelling the transaction role of money and the essentiality of money in a hyperinflation context

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  • Alexandre Sokic

Abstract

This paper uses an analytical approach and the precise definition of money essentiality given by Scheinkman (1980) with the aim to establish a formal theoretical link between the possibility of hyperinflationary paths and the concept of money essentiality. In this respect the paper contributes to the understanding of the well known failure of Cagan based inflationary finance models to produce explosive hyperinflation. We consider two standard optimizing monetary models representing alternative ways of modelling the transaction role of money. The paper considers a money-in-the-utility-function model and a cash-in-advance model where representative agent’s preferences are represented by general utility functions. We show that modelling monetary hyperinflation with perfect foresight is closely linked to the concept of money essentiality as defined by Scheinkman (1980). The possibility of explosive monetary hyperinflation in a perfect foresight inflationary finance model always relies on a sufficient level of money essentiality. The main contribution of this paper is to show that, whether in a cash-in-advance or in a money-in-the-utility-function framework, this sufficient level of money essentiality does not depend on the specific way, cash-in-advance or moneyin- the-utility-function, of modelling the role of money as a medium of exchange.

Suggested Citation

  • Alexandre Sokic, 2008. "Modelling the transaction role of money and the essentiality of money in a hyperinflation context," Working Papers of BETA 2008-12, Bureau d'Economie Théorique et Appliquée, UDS, Strasbourg.
  • Handle: RePEc:ulp:sbbeta:2008-12
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    File URL: http://www.beta-umr7522.fr/productions/publications/2008/2008-12.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Tang, De-piao & Wang, Ping, 1993. "On relative price variability and hyperinflation," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 42(2-3), pages 209-214.
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    3. Obstfeld, Maurice & Rogoff, Kenneth, 1983. "Speculative Hyperinflations in Maximizing Models: Can We Rule Them Out?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 91(4), pages 675-687, August.
    4. Evans, Jean Lynne & Yarrow, George Keith, 1981. "Some Implications of Alternative Expectations Hypotheses in the Monetary Analysis of Hyperinflations," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 33(1), pages 61-80, March.
    5. Vazquez, Jesus, 1998. "How high can inflation get during hyperinflation? A transaction cost demand for money approach," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 433-451, August.
    6. Buiter, Willem H, 1987. "A Fiscal Theory of Hyperdeflations? Some Surprising Monetarist Arithmetic," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 39(1), pages 111-118, March.
    7. María-José Gutiérrez & Jesús Vázquez, 2004. "Explosive Hyperinflation, Inflation-Tax Curve, and Modeling the Use of Money," Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics (JITE), Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 160(2), pages 311-311, June.
    8. de Holanda Barbosa, Fernando & Barros da Cunha, Alexandre, 2003. "Inflation tax and money essentiality," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 78(2), pages 187-195, February.
    9. Casella, Alessandra & Feinstein, Jonathan S, 1990. "Economic Exchange during Hyperinflation," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(1), pages 1-27, February.
    10. Michael Bruno & Stanley Fischer, 1990. "Seigniorage, Operating Rules, and the High Inflation Trap," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 105(2), pages 353-374.
    11. Calvo, Guillermo A, 1987. "Balance of Payments Crises in a Cash-in-Advance Economy," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 19(1), pages 19-32, February.
    12. Evans, J Lynne, 1995. "The Demand for Money: Hyperinflation or High Inflation Traps," The Manchester School of Economic & Social Studies, University of Manchester, vol. 63(0), pages 49-56, Suppl..
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    Keywords

    monetary hyperinflation; inflation tax; money essentiality.;

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E41 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Demand for Money

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