IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ude/wpaper/2112.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Is Catching Up with Developed World’s Levels of Skills Possible for Poorer Countries?

Author

Listed:
  • Andrea Doneschi

    () (Departamento de Economía, Facultad de Ciencias Sociales, Universidad de la República)

  • Rossana Patrón

    () (Departamento de Economía, Facultad de Ciencias Sociales, Universidad de la República)

  • Marcel Vaillant

    () (Departamento de Economía, Facultad de Ciencias Sociales, Universidad de la República)

Abstract

Some countries seem to be lagging behind in global accumulation of skills. As the ratio of skilled to unskilled labour is key for growth (e.g. endogenous growth theory), this situation suggests a gloomy future for developing countries. Is catching up with the developed world?s levels of skills still possible? The poor performance of the education sector in many countries casts serious doubts on this. This note addresses this question, discussing the simplest necessary conditions for skill convergence. It is shown that the high share of unskilled workers in the inflow of entrants to the labour market may perpetuate low levels of skills endowment, making it impossible to catch up with the developed world. However, education policy could regulate the level and the speed of the accumulation process through suitable strategies.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrea Doneschi & Rossana Patrón & Marcel Vaillant, 2012. "Is Catching Up with Developed World’s Levels of Skills Possible for Poorer Countries?," Documentos de Trabajo (working papers) 2112, Department of Economics - dECON.
  • Handle: RePEc:ude:wpaper:2112
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://cienciassociales.edu.uy/departamentodeeconomia/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2013/archivos/2112.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Barro, Robert J & Lee, Jong-Wha, 2001. "International Data on Educational Attainment: Updates and Implications," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 53(3), pages 541-563, July.
    2. Robert J. Barro, 1991. "Economic Growth in a Cross Section of Countries," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 407-443.
    3. Robert J. Barro & Xavier Sala-i-Martin, 1991. "Convergence across States and Regions," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 22(1), pages 107-182.
    4. Su, Xuejuan, 2006. "Endogenous determination of public budget allocation across education stages," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(2), pages 438-456, December.
    5. Su, Xuejuan, 2004. "The allocation of public funds in a hierarchical educational system," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 28(12), pages 2485-2510, December.
    6. Barro, Robert J & Sala-i-Martin, Xavier, 1992. "Convergence," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(2), pages 223-251, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    skills accumulation; catching up;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I22 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Educational Finance; Financial Aid
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ude:wpaper:2112. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Andrea Doneschi) or (Héctor Pastori). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/derauuy.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.