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Measuring the Redistributive Effect of Pensions

Author

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  • Alvaro Forteza

    (Departamento de Economía, Facultad de Ciencias Sociales, Universidad de la República)

Abstract

In this document, I present a conceptual framework for the analysis of the redistributive effect of pensions. The paper makes specific recommendations on the controversial issue of whether pensions should be treated as transfers or deferred income. I show that most pension programs have both dimensions in different degrees and present a proposal to deal with them in a unified framework. The proposal has specific recommendations in terms of accounting and counterfactuals. Using some simple examples, I show that usual accounting and “nonbehavioral” assumptions —particularly regarding non-labor income— may be very misleading.

Suggested Citation

  • Alvaro Forteza, 2017. "Measuring the Redistributive Effect of Pensions," Documentos de Trabajo (working papers) 1317, Department of Economics - dECON.
  • Handle: RePEc:ude:wpaper:1317
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    File URL: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12008/19966
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jonathan Gruber & David A. Wise, 1999. "Introduction to "Social Security and Retirement around the World"," NBER Chapters, in: Social Security and Retirement around the World, pages 1-35, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Jonathan Gruber & David A. Wise, 1999. "Social Security and Retirement around the World," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number grub99-1, January.
    3. Alvaro Forteza & Irene Mussio, 2012. "Assessing Redistribution in the Uruguayan Social Security System," Journal of Income Distribution, Ad libros publications inc., vol. 21(1), pages 65-87, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Pensions; redistribution; fiscal incidence analysis;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs

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