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Migration’s Income and Poverty Impact

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  • Maurice Schiff

Abstract

In estimating the impact of migration on income and poverty, existing studies have typically overlooked the fact that migration changes the size of the household. The ‘corrected’ impact that takes the change in household size into account is presented analytically and is estimated on the basis of data from Ghana’s GLSS household survey. The latter is shown to be equal to 2.6 to 4.6 times the impact obtained from standard analysis.

Suggested Citation

  • Maurice Schiff, 2006. "Migration’s Income and Poverty Impact," Working Papers wp227, University of Chile, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:udc:wpaper:wp227
    as

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    File URL: http://www.econ.uchile.cl/uploads/publicacion/af620b28-7075-4ced-bd73-64515b94194d.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Taylor, J Edward & Rozelle, Scott & de Brauw, Alan, 2003. "Migration and Incomes in Source Communities: A New Economics of Migration Perspective from China," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 52(1), pages 75-101, October.
    2. Adams, Richard H. Jr., 2006. "Remittances and poverty in Ghana," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3838, The World Bank.
    3. Adams, Richard Jr. & Page, John, 2005. "Do international migration and remittances reduce poverty in developing countries?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(10), pages 1645-1669, October.
    4. Taylor, J. Edward, 1992. "Remittances and inequality reconsidered: Direct, indirect, and intertemporal effects," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 187-208, April.
    5. Acosta, Pablo, 2006. "Labor supply, school attendance, and remittances from international migration : the case of El Salvador," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3903, The World Bank.
    6. Barham, Bradford & Boucher, Stephen, 1998. "Migration, remittances, and inequality: estimating the net effects of migration on income distribution," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(2), pages 307-331, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Migration; income; poverty; underestimation; reference groups;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • O19 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - International Linkages to Development; Role of International Organizations
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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