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Did the Aid Boom Pacify Sub-Saharan Africa?: Ex-Post Evaluation Using a Near-Identification Approach

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  • Azam, Jean-Paul
  • Thelen, Véronique

Abstract

The incidence of civil war in Sub-Saharan Africa since the turn of the century is less than half of what it was on average in the last quarter of the 20th century. This paper shows that the aid boom triggered by 9/11 played a key role in achieving purposefully this result using panel data for 46 African countries over four decades. It applies a nearidentification approach to test the aid-conflict trade-off, taking due account of asymmetric information between the donors and the econometrician. Preference proxies are used in the first-stage to elicit the relevant hidden information.

Suggested Citation

  • Azam, Jean-Paul & Thelen, Véronique, 2014. "Did the Aid Boom Pacify Sub-Saharan Africa?: Ex-Post Evaluation Using a Near-Identification Approach," TSE Working Papers 14-544, Toulouse School of Economics (TSE), revised Jun 2019.
  • Handle: RePEc:tse:wpaper:28857
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Foreign Aid; Africa; Civil Wars;

    JEL classification:

    • F35 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Aid
    • N47 - Economic History - - Government, War, Law, International Relations, and Regulation - - - Africa; Oceania
    • P45 - Economic Systems - - Other Economic Systems - - - International Linkages

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