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Uncertainty and Insurance in Endogenous Climate Change


  • Georg Müller-Fürstenberger
  • Ingmar Schumacher


We investigate the economic impact of stochastic endogenous extreme events and insurance in a growth model. Our analytical results and computational experiments show that i) transparency of the insurance sector is the decisive requisite for abatement activities, implying substantial policy opportunities; ii) we can fully characterize and quantify the impact of uncertainty on the social planner's decisions; iii) a decentralized economy will under-invest in abatement without adequate policy interventions; iv) precautionary beliefs on the frequency of extreme events lead to more sustainability; v) technical change does not change the ordering of the paths but leads to a more sustainable future; v) a social security system which prices insurance fairly is preferable to an insurance industry which provides insurance with an overhead.

Suggested Citation

  • Georg Müller-Fürstenberger & Ingmar Schumacher, 2009. "Uncertainty and Insurance in Endogenous Climate Change," Research Papers in Economics 2009-02, University of Trier, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:trr:wpaper:200902

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Ken Sennewald & Klaus Wälde, 2006. "“Itô's Lemma” and the Bellman Equation for Poisson Processes: An Applied View," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 89(1), pages 1-36, October.
    2. Gjerde, Jon & Grepperud, Sverre & Kverndokk, Snorre, 1999. "Optimal climate policy under the possibility of a catastrophe," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(3-4), pages 289-317, August.
    3. Keller, Klaus & Bolker, Benjamin M. & Bradford, D.F.David F., 2004. "Uncertain climate thresholds and optimal economic growth," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 723-741, July.
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    More about this item


    economic growth; climate change; insurance; integrated assessment; extreme events; catastrophes;

    JEL classification:

    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development


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