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Intraday Trading Patterns: The Role of Timing

  • Katya Malinova
  • Andreas Park

In a dynamic model of financial market trading multiple heterogeneously informed traders choose when to place orders. Better informed traders trade immediately, worse informed delay — even though they expect the public expectation to move against them. This behavior causes distinct intra-day patterns with decreasing (L-shaped) spreads and increasing (reverse L-shaped) volume and probability of informed trading (PIN). Competition increases market participation and causes more pronounced spread and less pronounced volume patterns. Systematic improvements in information increase spreads and volume. Very short-lived private information generates L- or reverse J-shaped volume patterns, which are further enhanced by competition.

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Paper provided by University of Toronto, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number tecipa-365.

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Length: 44 pages
Date of creation: 01 Aug 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:tor:tecipa:tecipa-365
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  1. Kyle, Albert S, 1985. "Continuous Auctions and Insider Trading," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 53(6), pages 1315-35, November.
  2. Anat R. Admati, Paul Pfleiderer, 1988. "A Theory of Intraday Patterns: Volume and Price Variability," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 1(1), pages 3-40.
  3. Archishman Chakraborty & Bilge Yilmaz, . "Informed Manipulation," Rodney L. White Center for Financial Research Working Papers 07-00, Wharton School Rodney L. White Center for Financial Research.
  4. Paul Milgrom & Nancy L.Stokey, 1979. "Information, Trade, and Common Knowledge," Discussion Papers 377R, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.
  5. Chris Brooks & Melvin. J. Hinich & Douglas M. Patterson, 2003. "Intra-day Patterns in the Returns, Bidask Spereads, and Trading Volume of Stocks Traded on the New York Stock Exchange," ICMA Centre Discussion Papers in Finance icma-dp2003-14, Henley Business School, Reading University.
  6. Brock, William A. & Kleidon, Allan W., 1992. "Periodic market closure and trading volume : A model of intraday bids and asks," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 16(3-4), pages 451-489.
  7. Lones Smith, 2000. "Private Information and Trade Timing," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 1012-1018, September.
  8. David K. Ding & Sie Ting Lau, 2001. "An Analysis of Transactions Data for the Stock Exchange of Singapore: Patterns, Absolute Price Change, Trade Size and Number of Transactions," Journal of Business Finance & Accounting, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(1-2), pages 151-174.
  9. Chan, K C & Christie, William G & Schultz, Paul H, 1995. "Market Structure and the Intraday Pattern of Bid-Ask Spreads for NASDAQ Securities," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 68(1), pages 35-60, January.
  10. Charlie X. Cai & Robert Hudson & Kevin Keasey, 2004. "Intra Day Bid-Ask Spreads, Trading Volume and Volatility: Recent Empirical Evidence from the London Stock Exchange," Journal of Business Finance & Accounting, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 31(5-6), pages 647-676.
  11. Katya Malinova & Andreas Park, 2009. "Trading Volume in Dealer Markets," Working Papers tecipa-357, University of Toronto, Department of Economics.
  12. Lee, Charles M C & Mucklow, Belinda & Ready, Mark J, 1993. "Spreads, Depths, and the Impact of Earnings Information: An Intraday Analysis," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 6(2), pages 345-74.
  13. Kerry Back & Shmuel Baruch, 2007. "Working Orders in Limit Order Markets and Floor Exchanges," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 62(4), pages 1589-1621, 08.
  14. Foster, F Douglas & Viswanathan, S, 1990. "A Theory of the Interday Variations in Volume, Variance, and Trading Costs in Securities Markets," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 3(4), pages 593-624.
  15. Yi-Tsung Lee & Robert C.W. Fok & Yu-Jane Liu, 2001. "Explaining Intraday Pattern of Trading Volume from the Order Flow Data," Journal of Business Finance & Accounting, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(1-2), pages 199-230.
  16. Easley, David, et al, 1996. " Liquidity, Information, and Infrequently Traded Stocks," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 51(4), pages 1405-36, September.
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