IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/jbfnac/v31y2004-06i5-6p647-676.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Intra Day Bid-Ask Spreads, Trading Volume and Volatility: Recent Empirical Evidence from the London Stock Exchange

Author

Listed:
  • Charlie X. Cai
  • Robert Hudson
  • Kevin Keasey

Abstract

With the benefit of very high frequency (25 million 1 minute observations) and recent data (2001) for the UK, this paper explores a number of intra day patterns of stock market behaviour. More specifically, a distinct reverse J shaped bid-ask spread pattern is noted for SETS securities, a declining bid-ask spread pattern for non-SETS securities, a two hump pattern for trading volume and a U-shaped pattern for returns volatility for all securities. In terms of complementing the existing literature, the paper shows that differences in trading systems may affect the bid-ask spread patterns, while differences in market environments (i.e. US and UK markets) seems to affect the trading volume pattern. The paper suggests avenues for future research, in particular, the need to consider what factors are significant in determining intra day patterns for different trading systems and the need for additional cross-market comparisons to identify how institutional factors affect the behaviour of investors on an intra day basis. Copyright Blackwell Publishers Ltd, 2003.

Suggested Citation

  • Charlie X. Cai & Robert Hudson & Kevin Keasey, 2004. "Intra Day Bid-Ask Spreads, Trading Volume and Volatility: Recent Empirical Evidence from the London Stock Exchange," Journal of Business Finance & Accounting, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 31(5-6), pages 647-676.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jbfnac:v:31:y:2004-06:i:5-6:p:647-676
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.0306-686X.2004.00552.x
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Evans, Kevin P. & Speight, Alan E.H., 2010. "Intraday periodicity, calendar and announcement effects in Euro exchange rate volatility," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 24(1), pages 82-101, January.
    2. Andreas Park, 2008. "Bid-Ask Spreads and Volume:The Role of Trade Timing," Working Papers tecipa-309, University of Toronto, Department of Economics.
    3. Chelley-Steeley, Patricia & Park, Keebong, 2011. "Intraday patterns in London listed Exchange Traded Funds," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 20(5), pages 244-251.
    4. Katya Malinova & Andreas Park, 2009. "Intraday Trading Patterns: The Role of Timing," Working Papers tecipa-365, University of Toronto, Department of Economics.
    5. Miralles-Quirós, José Luis & Daza-Izquierdo, Julio, 2015. "Do DOW returns really influence the intraday Spanish stock market behavior?," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 99-126.
    6. Liu, Qingfu & Hua, Renhai & An, Yunbi, 2016. "Determinants and information content of intraday bid-ask spreads: Evidence from Chinese commodity futures markets," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 135-148.
    7. Kim, Yong H. & Yang, J. Jimmy, 2008. "The effect of price limits on intraday volatility and information asymmetry," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 16(5), pages 522-538, November.
    8. Malinova, Katya & Park, Andreas, 2014. "The impact of competition and information on intraday trading," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 55-71.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:jbfnac:v:31:y:2004-06:i:5-6:p:647-676. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0306-686X .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.