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Generalized switching regression analysis of private and public sector wage structures in Germany

Author

Listed:
  • Dustmann, C.
  • van Soest, A.H.O.

    (Tilburg University, Center For Economic Research)

Abstract

This paper analyzes wage structures in the public and the private sector for Germany. The data contains a rich set of variables on parents' characteristics that we use as instruments. We extend the empirical literature in this field by endogenizing education level and hours worked, and by using life cycle wage differentials in the structural selection equation. We show that these extentions significantly improve the standard model. Moreover, they lead to considerably different parameter estimates. We compute conditional and unconditional wage predictions for the various specifications using model simulations. We find that, on average, potential wages in the private sector exceed those in the public sector. Those actually working in the public sector, would do somewhat better in the private sector, while those working in the private sector would earn much less in the public sector.

Suggested Citation

  • Dustmann, C. & van Soest, A.H.O., 1995. "Generalized switching regression analysis of private and public sector wage structures in Germany," Discussion Paper 1995-44, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:tiu:tiucen:50ffeb05-ea9e-45c6-973c-07c5fdc932cf
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    File URL: https://pure.uvt.nl/portal/files/521159/44.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    3. van Ophem, Hans, 1993. "A Modified Switching Regression Model for Earnings Differentials between the Public and Private Sectors in the Netherlands," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 75(2), pages 215-224, May.
    4. Holmlund, Bertil, 1993. "Wage setting in private and public sectors in a model with endogenous government behavior," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 9(2), pages 149-162, May.
    5. Jacobson, Tor & Ohlsson, Henry, 1994. "Long-Run Relations between Private and Public Sector Wages in Sweden," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 19(3), pages 343-360.
    6. Morton Stelcner & Jacques van der Gaag & Wim Vijverberg, 1989. "A Switching Regression Model of Public-Private Sector Wage Differentials in Peru: 1985-86," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 24(3), pages 545-559.
    7. Anthony Downs, 1957. "An Economic Theory of Political Action in a Democracy," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 65, pages 135-135.
    8. Gindling, T H, 1991. "Labor Market Segmentation and the Determination of Wages in the Public, Private-Formal, and Informal Sectors in San Jose, Costa Rica," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 39(3), pages 584-605, April.
    9. Heckman, James J, 1990. "Varieties of Selection Bias," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(2), pages 313-318, May.
    10. Morley Gunderson, 1979. "Earnings Differentials between the Public and Private Sectors," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 12(2), pages 228-242, May.
    11. Zweimuller, J & Winter-Ebmer, R, 1994. "Gender Wage Differentials in Private and Public Sector Jobs," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 7(3), pages 271-285, July.
    12. De Fraja, Giovanni, 1993. "Unions and Wages in Public and Private Firms: A Game-Theoretic Analysis," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 45(3), pages 457-469, July.
    13. Theeuwes, J. & Koopmans, C. C. & Van Opstal, R. & Van Reijn, H., 1985. "Estimation of optimal human capital accumulation parameters for The Netherlands," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 233-257.
    14. van der Gaag, Jacques & Vijverberg, Wim, 1988. "A Switching Regression Model for Wage Determinants in the Public and Private Sectors of a Developing Country," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 70(2), pages 244-252, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Moundir, Lassassi & Menna, Khaled, 2016. "La Notion De « Femmes Au Foyer » En Algerie, Une Realite Ou Une Representation Nostalgique
      [The Notion Of “ Homemaker” In Algeria, A Reality Or A Nostalgic Representation]
      ," MPRA Paper 85740, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Asplund, Rita, 2002. "Private vs. Public Sector Returns to Human Capital in Finland," Discussion Papers 607, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.
    3. Menna, Khaled & Lassassi, Moundir, 2016. "المرأة الماكثة في البيت في الجزائر: قدرات منسية؟!
      [The Housewives In Algeria: Forgotten Capacities?]
      ," MPRA Paper 85421, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Regression Analysis; Public Choice; Wage Differentials; labour economics;

    JEL classification:

    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • C34 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Truncated and Censored Models; Switching Regression Models

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