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Long-Run Effects of Gestation during the Dutch Hunger Winter Famine on Labor Market and Hospitalization Outcomes

Author

Listed:
  • Robert S. Scholte

    (VU University Amsterdam)

  • Gerard J. van den Berg

    (University of Mannheim, VU University Amsterdam)

  • Maarten Lindeboom

    (VU University Amsterdam)

Abstract

This discussion paper resulted in a publication in the 'Journal of Health Economics' 2015, 39, 17-30. This is the first study to analyze effects of in utero exposure to the severe Dutch Hunger Winter famine (1944/45) on labor market outcomes and hospitalization. This famine is clearly demarcated in time and space. It was not anticipated. Nutritional conditions were stable before and after the famine. We provide results of exposure by sub-interval of gestation. We are the first to use population registers for the full population. We find a significantly negative effect of exposure during the first trimester of gestation on employment outcomes 53 or more years after birth, as well as effects on hospitalization.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert S. Scholte & Gerard J. van den Berg & Maarten Lindeboom, 2012. "Long-Run Effects of Gestation during the Dutch Hunger Winter Famine on Labor Market and Hospitalization Outcomes," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 12-013/3, Tinbergen Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:tin:wpaper:20120013
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Heather Royer, 2009. "Separated at Girth: US Twin Estimates of the Effects of Birth Weight," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 1(1), pages 49-85, January.
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    6. Neelsen, Sven & Stratmann, Thomas, 2011. "Effects of prenatal and early life malnutrition: Evidence from the Greek famine," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 479-488, May.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    famine; long-run effects; labor and hospitalization outcomes;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • J01 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics: General
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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