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Non-core Liabilities and Credit Growth

Author

Listed:
  • Zubeyir Kilinc
  • Hatice Gokce Karasoy
  • Eray Yucel

Abstract

The composition of bank liabilities has captured a lot of attention especially after the global financial crisis. It is argued that movements particularly in the non-core liabilities may reflect the stage of financial cycle. The literature claims that banks usually fund their credits with core liabilities, which grow with households� wealth, but when there is a faster growth in credits compared to deposits, the banks resort to non-core liabilities to meet the excess demand. Despite this significant role assumed to be played by the non-core liabilities, there are not too many country-specific studies on this issue. This study analyzes the relationship between the non-core liabilities and credits within a small open economy, namely Turkey. It investigates the relationship under alternative settings and reveals a robust relationship between credits and non-core liabilities under all frameworks. The study also verifies that elevated demand for credit may induce some increase in the non-core liabilities. Finally, the relationship is affirmed in the long-run.

Suggested Citation

  • Zubeyir Kilinc & Hatice Gokce Karasoy & Eray Yucel, 2013. "Non-core Liabilities and Credit Growth," Working Papers 1324, Research and Monetary Policy Department, Central Bank of the Republic of Turkey.
  • Handle: RePEc:tcb:wpaper:1324
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    File URL: https://www.tcmb.gov.tr/wps/wcm/connect/EN/TCMB+EN/Main+Menu/Publications/Research/Working+Paperss/2013/13-24
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Etkin Ozen & Cem Sahin & Ibrahim Unalmis, 2013. "External Financial Stress and External Financing Vulnerability in Turkey : Some Policy Implications for Financial Stability," Central Bank Review, Research and Monetary Policy Department, Central Bank of the Republic of Turkey, vol. 13(Special I), pages 65-74.
    2. Ross Levine & Norman Loayza & Thorsten Beck, 2002. "Financial Intermediation and Growth: Causality and Causes," Central Banking, Analysis, and Economic Policies Book Series, in: Leonardo Hernández & Klaus Schmidt-Hebbel & Norman Loayza (Series Editor) & Klaus Schmidt-Hebbel (Se (ed.),Banking, Financial Integration, and International Crises, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 2, pages 031-084, Central Bank of Chile.
    3. Robert G. King & Ross Levine, 1993. "Finance and Growth: Schumpeter Might Be Right," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 108(3), pages 717-737.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Kurmaş AKDOĞAN & Burcu Deniz YILDIRIM, 2014. "Non-core Liabilities as an Indicator of Systemic Risk and a Liquidity Stress Test Application on Turkish Banking System," Iktisat Isletme ve Finans, Bilgesel Yayincilik, vol. 29(338), pages 39-66.
    2. Engin Yilmaz & Bora Suslu, 2016. "Turkish Non-Core Bank Liabilities," South-Eastern Europe Journal of Economics, Association of Economic Universities of South and Eastern Europe and the Black Sea Region, vol. 14(1), pages 75-92.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Core Liabilities; Non-core Liabilities; Credits; Small Open Economy; VAR; VECM;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E51 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Money Supply; Credit; Money Multipliers

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