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Patience, Cognitive Abilities, and Cognitive Effort: Survey and Experimental Evidence from a Developing Country

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Listed:
  • Stefania Bortolotti

    (University of Bologna, IZA)

  • Thomas Dohmen

    (University of Bonn, IZA, Maastricht University, ROA, DIW)

  • Hartmut Lehmann

    (National Research University Higher School of Economics, Russia, IZA, University of Bologna)

  • Frauke Meyer

    (Forschungszentrum Julich)

  • Norberto Pignatti

    (International School of Economics at Tbilisi State University (ISET), Tbilisi; IZA)

  • Karine Torosyan

    (International School of Economics at Tbilisi State University, Tbilisi (ISET);)

Abstract

We shed new light on the relationship between cognition and patience, by providing documenting that the correlation between cognitive abilities and delay discounting is weaker for the same group of individuals if choices are incentivized. We conjecture that the exertion of higher cognitive effort, which induces higher involvement of the cognitive system, moderates the relationship between patience and cognition. To test this hypothesis, we analyze the relationship between various measures of cognitive ability, including the cognitive reflection test (CRT), a symbol-correspondence test, a numeracy test, as well as self-reported math ability and the interviewer’s assessment of the respondent’s sharpness and understanding, and di↵erent measures of patience, including incentivized choices between smaller sooner and larger later monetary payments and hypothetical inter-temporal trade-offs, for 107 subjects drawn from the adult population in Tbilisi (Georgia).

Suggested Citation

  • Stefania Bortolotti & Thomas Dohmen & Hartmut Lehmann & Frauke Meyer & Norberto Pignatti & Karine Torosyan, 2021. "Patience, Cognitive Abilities, and Cognitive Effort: Survey and Experimental Evidence from a Developing Country," Working Papers 001-21, International School of Economics at TSU, Tbilisi, Republic of Georgia.
  • Handle: RePEc:tbs:wpaper:21-001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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