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Post-Keynesian Theory, Direct Action and Political Involvement

Author

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  • G.C. Harcourt

    (Jesus College, Cambridge University and School of Economics, University of New South Wales)

Abstract

In this paper I analyse how I became an economist and at the same time a democratic socialist and a Christian. I also explained how I became politically involved after my graduate studies at Cambridge in the late 1950s and started lecturing at Adelaide. When back in Cambridge, teaching in the 1960s this time, the war in Vietnam persuaded me to support direct action through the anti-war movement in South Australia when I returned to Adelaide in 1967. The 1960s and the events of the time did influence my approach to teaching and research. More concretely, I was persuaded that ideology and analysis were indissolubly mixed and that one’s stance should always be made explicit. How this influenced what I did in my years in Adelaide, and then from 1982 back in Cambridge, along with my earlier experiences, are all described in the paper.

Suggested Citation

  • G.C. Harcourt, 2010. "Post-Keynesian Theory, Direct Action and Political Involvement," Discussion Papers 2010-13, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.
  • Handle: RePEc:swe:wpaper:2010-13
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    File URL: http://research.economics.unsw.edu.au/RePEc/papers/2010-13.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Harcourt,G. C., 1972. "Some Cambridge Controversies in the Theory of Capital," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521096720, May.
    2. G. C. Harcourt, 1965. "The Accountant In A Golden Age," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 17(1), pages 66-80.
    3. Stiglitz, Joseph E, 1974. "The Cambridge-Cambridge Controversy in the Theory of Capital: A View from New Haven: A Review Article," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(4), pages 893-903, July/Aug..
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Political Economy; Political and Religious Beliefs; Ideology and Analysis; Direct Action;

    JEL classification:

    • A0 - General Economics and Teaching - - General
    • A1 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics
    • A2 - General Economics and Teaching - - Economic Education and Teaching of Economics
    • B0 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - General
    • B2 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought since 1925
    • B3 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought: Individuals

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