IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/stc/stcp3e/1997100e.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

An Experimental Canadian Survey that Links Workplace Practices and Employee Outcomes: Why it is Needed and How it Works

Author

Listed:
  • Picot, Garnett
  • Wannell, Ted

Abstract

Fundamental changes have taken place in the labour market and among firms in the 1980s and 1990s. In some cases we understand what has occurred, but notwhy. In other cases the data do not exist to shed light on exactly what is happening, let alone why. Changes in the labour market are often related to changes in theway in which firms are engaging and paying labour, the adoption of new technologies, changes in the types of markets in which firms compete, and other eventsoccurring in firms; i.e. changes on the demand side of the labour market. But data have never existed that allowed events occurring in firms to be related to theoutcomes for the workers. This paper outlines why such data are necessary. The example of rising inequality is used to demonstrate the need for such a survey. Alsopresented is an outline of how the new data can be provided using a new approach to surveying. The proposed survey first surveys establishments, and then surveysworkers within that establishment. In this way a direct link is made between the activities in the establishment and the outcomes for the workers. Conversely, a directlink is established between the events in the firm and the characteristics of the workers, another area of research that has suffered from a lack of data at themicro-level. This paper outlines why such a survey is needed, the possible content, and research topics that could be addressed with such data.

Suggested Citation

  • Picot, Garnett & Wannell, Ted, 1997. "An Experimental Canadian Survey that Links Workplace Practices and Employee Outcomes: Why it is Needed and How it Works," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 1997100e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
  • Handle: RePEc:stc:stcp3e:1997100e
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/en/catalogue/11F0019M1997100
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Steven J. Davis, 1992. "Cross-Country Patterns of Change in Relative Wages," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1992, Volume 7, pages 239-300, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. John M. Abowd & Francis Kramarz & David N. Margolis, 1999. "High Wage Workers and High Wage Firms," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 67(2), pages 251-334, March.
    3. Richard B. Freeman & Karen Needels, 1993. "Skill Differentials in Canada in an Era of Rising Labor Market Inequality," NBER Chapters, in: Small Differences That Matter: Labor Markets and Income Maintenance in Canada and the United States, pages 45-68, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Heisz, Andrew, 1996. "Changes in Job Tenure and Job Stability in Canada," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 1996095e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    5. Morissette, Rene, 1995. "Why Has Inequality in Weekly Earnings Increased in Canada?," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 1995080e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    6. Osberg, Lars, 1995. "The Missing Link - Data on the Demand Side of Labour Markets," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 1995077e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    7. Levy, Frank & Murnane, Richard J, 1992. "U.S. Earnings Levels and Earnings Inequality: A Review of Recent Trends and Proposed Explanations," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 30(3), pages 1333-1381, September.
    8. Richard B. Freeman, 1995. "Are Your Wages Set in Beijing?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(3), pages 15-32, Summer.
    9. Beach, C.M. & Slotsve, G.A., 1994. "Polarization of Earnings in the Canadian Labour Market: A Non-Microdata Approach," Working Papers 17, John Deutsch Institute for the Study of Economic Policy.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:stc:stcp3e:1997100e. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Mark Brown). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/stagvca.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.