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Are tax exemptions for electric cars an efficient climate policy measure?

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    This study finds that the welfare gain, excluding environmental effects, generated by increasing the Norwegian tax rate on purchase of electric cars from 8 to 37 percent amounts to approximately 5500- 6500 NOK (or 680-820 euro) per ton increase in GHG emissions in the long run. Substantial tax exemptions implies that reallocation from electric cars towards petrol and diesel powered cars generates a tax revenue gain of more than 40 billion NOK, which amounts to almost 10 percent of government consumption in 2007.

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    Paper provided by Statistics Norway, Research Department in its series Discussion Papers with number 743.

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    Date of creation: May 2013
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    Handle: RePEc:ssb:dispap:743
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    1. Bas Jacobs & Ruud A. de Mooij, 2011. "Pigou Meets Mirrlees: On the Irrelevance of Tax Distortions for the Second-Best Pigouvian Tax," CESifo Working Paper Series 3342, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. John K. Dagsvik & Gang Liu, 2006. "A Framework for Analyzing Rank Ordered Panel Data with Application to Automobile Demand," Discussion Papers 480, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    3. Parry, Ian W.H. & Walls, Margaret & Harrington, Winston, 2007. "Automobile Externalities and Policies," Discussion Papers dp-06-26, Resources For the Future.
    4. Caulfield, Brian & Farrell, Séona & McMahon, Brian, 2010. "Examining individuals preferences for hybrid electric and alternatively fuelled vehicles," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 17(6), pages 381-387, November.
    5. Danielle Devogelaer & Dominique Gusbin, 2010. "Working Paper 13-10 - Electric cars: Back to the future?," Working Papers 1013, Federal Planning Bureau, Belgium.
    6. A. Bovenberg, 1999. "Green Tax Reforms and the Double Dividend: an Updated Reader's Guide," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer, vol. 6(3), pages 421-443, August.
    7. Thiel, Christian & Perujo, Adolfo & Mercier, Arnaud, 2010. "Cost and CO2 aspects of future vehicle options in Europe under new energy policy scenarios," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(11), pages 7142-7151, November.
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