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Perspectives on the Decelerating Agricultural society

  • Tai-Yoo Kim

    ()

  • Almas Heshmati
  • Jihyun Park

    (Technology Management, Economics, and Policy Program (TEMEP); Seoul National University)

In general, societies are divided into agricultural and industrial societies. This study presents perspectives on decelerating agricultural societies. Agricultural demand and supply play major roles in the development of societies. Three theories that describe an agricultural society and its deceleration patterns are described: the neo-classical production function and those articulated by Johnston and Mellor as well as induced innovation by Hayami and Ruttan. Two important cases of decelerating agricultural societies, medieval England and the U.S., are investigated through an examination of the process of agricultural society deceleration and ultimate replacement by an industrial society. The limitations of decelerating agricultural societies, with a focus on structural problems,impacts on industrial structure, and problems of agriculture in market and non-market areas, are discussed. The position of agriculture as described by economic development theory is established by analyzing the stages of economic development, the theory ofstructural change, and the theory of leading industry. Finally, the transition from an agricultural to a commercial society is described with a focus on the formation,development, value creation, and structural limitations of a commercial society.

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File URL: ftp://147.46.237.98/DP-01.pdf
File Function: First version, 2009
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Paper provided by Seoul National University; Technology Management, Economics, and Policy Program (TEMEP) in its series TEMEP Discussion Papers with number 200901.

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Length: 48 pages
Date of creation: Jan 2009
Date of revision: Jan 2009
Handle: RePEc:snv:dp2009:200901
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  1. Allen, Robert C., 2000. "Economic structure and agricultural productivity in Europe, 1300 1800," European Review of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 4(01), pages 1-25, April.
  2. Giovanni Federico & Paolo Malanima, 2004. "Progress, decline, growth: product and productivity in Italian agriculture, 1000-2000," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 57(3), pages 437-464, 08.
  3. Gabre-Madhin, Eleni Z. & Barrett, Christopher B. & Dorosh, Paul A., 2003. "Technological change and price effects in agriculture," MTID discussion papers 62, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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