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A New State-Level Panel of Annual Inequality Measures Over the Period 1916 – 2005

  • Mark W. Frank

    ()

    (Department of Economics and International Business, Sam Houston State University)

This paper introduces a new panel of annual state-level income inequality measures over the ninety year period 1916-2005. Among many of the states inequality followed a Ushaped pattern over the past century, peaking both before the Great Depression and again at the time of the new millennium. The new panel reveals significant state-level variations, both before the year 1945, and regionally. While Northeastern states are strongly correlated with aggregate U.S. trends, we find many of the Western states have little overall correlation over the past century. The availability of this new panel may prove useful to empirical researchers interested in all aspects of income inequality, particularly given the panel’s unusually large number of both time-series and crosssectional observations.

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File URL: http://www.shsu.edu/academics/economics-and-international-business/documents/wp_series/wp08-02_paper.pdf
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Paper provided by Sam Houston State University, Department of Economics and International Business in its series Working Papers with number 0802.

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Date of creation: Oct 2008
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Handle: RePEc:shs:wpaper:0802
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  1. Frank A. Cowell & Fatemeh Mehta, 1982. "The Estimation and Interpolation of Inequality Measures," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 49(2), pages 273-290.
  2. Pesaran, M.H. & Smith, R., 1992. "Estimating Long-Run Relationships From Dynamic Heterogeneous Panels," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 9215, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
  3. Levy, Frank & Murnane, Richard J, 1992. "U.S. Earnings Levels and Earnings Inequality: A Review of Recent Trends and Proposed Explanations," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 30(3), pages 1333-81, September.
  4. Hongyi Li & Lyn Squire & Heng-fu Zou, 1998. "Explaining International and Intertemporal Variations in Income Inequality," CEMA Working Papers 73, China Economics and Management Academy, Central University of Finance and Economics.
  5. Peter Gottschalk, 1997. "Inequality, Income Growth, and Mobility: The Basic Facts," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 11(2), pages 21-40, Spring.
  6. Peter C. B. Phillips & Hyungsik R. Moon, 1999. "Linear Regression Limit Theory for Nonstationary Panel Data," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 67(5), pages 1057-1112, September.
  7. Klaus Deininger & Lyn Squire, 1996. "A New Data Set Measuring Income Inequality," CEMA Working Papers 512, China Economics and Management Academy, Central University of Finance and Economics.
  8. Claudia Goldin & Robert A. Margo, 1992. "The Great Compression: The Wage Structure in the United States at Mid-Century," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(1), pages 1-34.
  9. Mark D. Partridge, 2005. "Does Income Distribution Affect U.S. State Economic Growth?," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(2), pages 363-394.
  10. Peter Phillips & Hyungsik Moon, 2000. "Nonstationary panel data analysis: an overview of some recent developments," Econometric Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(3), pages 263-286.
  11. Hongyi Li & Lyn Squire & Tao Zhang & Heng-fu Zou, 1999. "A Data Set on Income Distribution," CEMA Working Papers 575, China Economics and Management Academy, Central University of Finance and Economics.
  12. Partridge, Mark D, 1997. "Is Inequality Harmful for Growth? Comment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(5), pages 1019-32, December.
  13. Hafiz Akhand & Haoming Liu, 2002. "Income inequality in the United States: what the individual tax files say," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(4), pages 255-259.
  14. Joanne M. Doyle & Ehsan Ahmed & Robert N. Horn, 1999. "The Effects of Labor Markets and Income Inequality on Crime: Evidence from Panel Data," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 65(4), pages 717-738, April.
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