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Evidences of the Intensity of the Balassa-Samuelson Phenomenon in the Romanian Economy

Author

Listed:
  • Altar, Moisa
  • Albu, Lucian Liviu

    (Institute of Economic Forecasting)

  • Dumitru, Ionut
  • Necula, Ciprian

Abstract

The paper presents some results revealing the existence of the Balassa-Samuelson effect in Romania as well as some estimates of its impact on inflation, appreciation of the real exchange rate and rising competitiveness of the Romanian economy. * Study within the CEEX Programme – Project No. 220/2006 “Economic Convergence and Role of Knowledge in Relation to the EU Integration”; Instiutul European din Romania – PAIS III; Studiul nr. 2/2005.

Suggested Citation

  • Altar, Moisa & Albu, Lucian Liviu & Dumitru, Ionut & Necula, Ciprian, 2009. "Evidences of the Intensity of the Balassa-Samuelson Phenomenon in the Romanian Economy," Working Papers of National Institute of Economic Research 090106, National Institute of Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:ror:wpince:090106
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Égert, Balázs, 2002. "Investigating the Balassa-Samuelson hypothesis in transition : Do we understand what we see?," BOFIT Discussion Papers 6/2002, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
    2. Christoph Fischer, 2004. "Real currency appreciation in accession countries: Balassa-Samuelson and investment demand," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 140(2), pages 179-210, June.
    3. Balázs Egert, 2002. "Investigating the Balassa-Samuelson hypothesis in the transition: Do we understand what we see? A panel study," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 10(2), pages 273-309, July.
    4. International Monetary Fund, 2001. "Interpreting Real Exchange Rate Movements in Transition Countries," IMF Working Papers 2001/056, International Monetary Fund.
    5. Rodriguez-Palenzuela, Diego & Thimann, Christian & Backé, Peter, 2002. "Inflation dynamics and dual inflation in accession countries: a 'New Keynesian' perspective," Working Paper Series 132, European Central Bank.
    6. Egert, Balazs, 2002. "Estimating the impact of the Balassa-Samuelson effect on inflation and the real exchange rate during the transition," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 1-16, April.
    7. Balázs Égert, 2002. "Does the Productivity-Bias Hypothesis Hold in the Transition? Evidence from Five CEE Economies in the 1990s," Eastern European Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(2), pages 5-37, March.
    8. Bo??tjan Jazbec, 2002. "Balassa-Samuelson Effect in Transition Economies: The Case of Slovenia," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 507, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    9. Laszlo Halpern & Charles Wyplosz, 2001. "Economic Transformation and Real Exchange Rates in the 2000s: The Balassa-Samuelson Connection," ECE Discussion Papers Series 2001_1, UNECE.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Balassa-Samuelson effect; exchange rate; inflation; competitiveness;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F33 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - International Monetary Arrangements and Institutions
    • O23 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Fiscal and Monetary Policy in Development
    • O24 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Trade Policy; Factor Movement; Foreign Exchange Policy
    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence

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