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Evacuation of Industry During the Great Patriotic War and the Growth of Russian Cities: Numerical Analysis
[Эвакуация Промышленности В Годы Великой Отечественной Войны И Рост Городов России: Численный Анализ]

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  • Mikhailova, Tatiana (Михайлова, Татьяна)

    (Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration (RANEPA))

Abstract

Quantitative studies of long-term trends in the spatial evolution of the Russian economy make it possible to better understand the factors that have affected the geographic structure of the economy in the past and to predict the consequences of regional policy in the future. The economic geography of modern Russia bears the consequences of the decisions of the planned Soviet economy for 70 years, and the impact of events in Russian history. The most significant of the historical factors affecting the geography of industry and population is the Great Patriotic War. However, studies of the consequences of the Second World War, based on real data on the distribution of population and enterprises, are still small due to the long period of inaccessibility of secret data.

Suggested Citation

  • Mikhailova, Tatiana (Михайлова, Татьяна), 2018. "Evacuation of Industry During the Great Patriotic War and the Growth of Russian Cities: Numerical Analysis [Эвакуация Промышленности В Годы Великой Отечественной Войны И Рост Городов России: Числен," Working Papers 031835, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration.
  • Handle: RePEc:rnp:wpaper:031835
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    References listed on IDEAS

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