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Cost-effectiveness of Disease Interventions in India

Author

Listed:
  • Chow, Jeffrey
  • Darley, Sarah R.

    () (Resources for the Future)

  • Laxminarayan, Ramanan

Abstract

Health improvements in India, while significant, have not kept up with rapid economic growth rates. The poor in India face high out-of-pocket payments for health care, a significant burden of infectious diseases, and a rapidly increasing burden of non-communicable diseases. Against this backdrop, the central government has proposed doubling government expenditures on health over the next few years. Planned increases in public spending will involve making difficult decisions about the most effective and efficient health interventions if they are to translate into improved population health. To inform the selection of interventions that should be included in a universal health package, this study generated and reviewed cost-effectiveness information for interventions that address the major causes of disease burden in India. We find that India has great potential for improving the health of its people at relatively low cost. Devoting just one percent of GDP (approximately US$6 billion) to a well-designed health program nationwide could save as much as 480 million healthy years of life.

Suggested Citation

  • Chow, Jeffrey & Darley, Sarah R. & Laxminarayan, Ramanan, 2007. "Cost-effectiveness of Disease Interventions in India," Discussion Papers dp-07-53, Resources For the Future.
  • Handle: RePEc:rff:dpaper:dp-07-53
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    File URL: http://www.rff.org/RFF/documents/RFF-DP-07-53.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bhatia, Mrigesh R & Fox-Rushby, Julia & Mills, Anne, 2004. "Cost-effectiveness of malaria control interventions when malaria mortality is low: insecticide-treated nets versus in-house residual spraying in India," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 59(3), pages 525-539, August.
    2. Dean T. Jamison & Joel G. Breman & Anthony R. Measham & George Alleyne & Mariam Claeson & David B. Evans & Prabhat Jha & Ann Mills & Philip Musgrove, 2006. "Disease Control Priorities in Developing Countries, Second Edition," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7242.
    3. Zimmermann, Roukayatou & Qaim, Matin, 2004. "Potential health benefits of Golden Rice: a Philippine case study," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 147-168, April.
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    1. repec:spr:ssefpa:v:9:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s12571-017-0701-3 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    India; health expenditures; cost-effectiveness; public spending;

    JEL classification:

    • H51 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Health
    • H70 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - General
    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health

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